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Also Sprach Zarathustra

By: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Excerpt: Zarathustra?s Vorrede. 1. Als Zarathustra dreissig Jahr alt war, verliess er seine Heimat und den See seiner Heimat und ging in das Gebirge. Hier genoss er seines Geistes und seiner Einsamkeit und wurde dessen zehn Jahr nicht muede. Endlich aber verwandelte sich sein Herz,?und eines Morgens stand er mit der Morgenroethe auf, trat vor die Sonne hin und sprach zu ihr also.

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Wisdom of the East

By: Shinran Shonin

Introduction: BY L. ADAMS BECK. It is a singular fact that though many of the earlier Buddhist Scriptures have been translated by competent scholars, comparatively little attention has been paid to later Buddhist devotional writings, and this although the developments of Buddhism in China and Japan give them the deepest interest as reflecting the spiritual mind of those two great countries. They cannot, however, be understood without some knowledge of the faith which pas...

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Under the Redwoods

By: Bret Harte

As night crept up from the valley that stormy afternoon, Sawyer's Ledge was at first quite blotted out by wind and rain, but presently reappeared in little nebulous star-like points along the mountain side, as the straggling cabins of the settlement were one by one lit up by the miners returning from tunnel and claim. These stars were of varying brilliancy that evening, two notably so—one that eventually resolved itself into a many-candled illumination of a cabin of evid...

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Passages from the American Notebooks, Volume 2

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Excerpt: April 16th. Since I last wrote, there has been an addition to our community of four gentlemen in sables, who promise to be among our most useful and respectable members. They arrived yesterday about noon. Mr. Ripley had proposed to them to join us, no longer ago than that very morning. I had some conversation with them in the afternoon, and was glad to hear them express much satisfaction with their new abode and all the arrangements. They do not appear to be ver...

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Sally Dows

By: Bret Harte

What had been in the cool gray of that summer morning a dewy country lane, marked only by a few wagon tracks that never encroached upon its grassy border, and indented only by the faint footprints of a crossing fox or coon, was now, before high noon, already crushed, beaten down, and trampled out of all semblance of its former graciousness. The heavy springless jolt of gun-carriage and caisson had cut deeply through the middle track; the hoofs of crowding cavalry had str...

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The Dutchman's Fireside

By: James Kirke Paulding

Excerpt: The idea of the following tale was conceived on reading, many years ago, ?The Memoirs of an American Lady,? by Mrs. Grant, of Laggan; and the work partly finished about that time. The reader acquainted with the book referred to will, perhaps, wonder at the indiscretion of the author of the Dutchman?s Fireside in thus, as it were, provoking a comparison with one of the finest sketches of early American manners ever drawn.

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Insectivorous Plants

By: Charles Darwin

gathered by chance a dozen plants, bearing fifty-six fully expanded leaves, and on thirty-one of these dead insects or remnants of them adhered; and, no doubt, many more would have been caught afterwards by these same leaves, and still more by those as yet not expanded. On one plant all six leaves had caught their prey; and on several plants very many leaves had caught more than a single insect. On one large leaf I found the remains of thirteen distinct insects. Flies (D...

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The Memoirs of Napoleon, Volume 3, 1799

By: Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

Establishment of a divan in each Egyptian province -- Desaix in Upper Egypt -- Ibrahim Bey beaten by Bonaparte at Balehye'h -- Sulkowsky wounded -- Disaster at Abonkir -- Dissatisfaction and murmurs of the army -- Dejection of the General-in-Chief -- His plan respecting Egypt -- Meditated descent upon England -- Bonaparte's censure of the Directory -- Intercepted correspondence. From the details I have already given respecting Bonaparte's plans for colonising Egypt, it w...

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Bells of Doom

By: Maxwell Grant

The question came in a suave tone. It was uttered by a shrewd-faced young man who was one of a party of four. The men were seated at a card table; the tuxedo-clad speaker was riffling a pack of cards as he spoke. Let's call it quits, Claverly, responded a second player. This man, middle-aged and portly, was pleasant in tone. We dock in New York early tomorrow. Some sleep wouldn't do us any harm. All right, Messler, agreed Claverly. You're the heavy loser. You're the one to choose....

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A Word, Only a Word

By: Georg Ebers

Excerpt: Volume 1. Chapter 1. ?A word, only a word!? cried a fresh, boyish voice, then two hands were loudly clapped and a gay laugh echoed through the forest. Hitherto silence had reigned under the boughs of the pines and tops of the beeches, but now a wood?pigeon joined in the lad?s laugh, and a jay, startled by the clapping of hands, spread its brown wings, delicately flecked with blue, and soared from one pine to another. Spring had entered the Black Forest a few wee...

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The Haunted Quack

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Excerpt: In the summer of 18 ,I made an excursion to Niagara. At Schenectady, finding the roads nearly impassable, I took passage in a canal?boat for Utica. The weather was dull and lowering. There were but few passengers on board; and of those few, none were sufficiently inviting in appearance to induce me to make any overtures to a travelling acquaintance. A stupid answer, or a surly monosyllable, were all that I got in return for the few simple questions I hazarded. A...

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War and Peace, Second Epilogue

By: Leo Nikoleyevich Tolstoy

Excerpt: History is the life of nations and of humanity. To seize and put into words, to describe directly the life of humanity or even of a single nation, appears impossible. The ancient historians all employed one and the same method to describe and seize the apparently elusive the life of a people. They described the activity of individuals who ruled the people, and regarded the activity of those men as representing the activity of the whole nation.

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A Master's Degree

By: Margaret Mccarter

Excerpt: IT happened by mere chance that the September day on which Professor Vincent Burgess, A.B., from Boston, first entered Sunrise College as instructor in Greek, was the same day on which Vic Burleigh, overgrown country boy from a Kansas claim out beyond the Walnut River, signed up with the secretary of the College Board and paid the entrance fee for his freshman year. And further, by chance, it happened that the two young men had first met at the gateway to the ca...

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The Art of Writing

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: literature alone is condemned to work in mosaic with finite and quite rigid words. You have seen these blocks, dear to the nursery: this one a pillar, that a pediment, a third a window or a vase. It is with blocks of just such arbitrary size and figure that the literary architect is condemned to design the palace of his art. Nor is this all; for since these blocks, or words, are the acknowledged currency of our daily affairs, there are here possible none of thos...

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Slave Narratives

By: Andrea Ball

Excerpt: Charlie Vaden?s father ran away and went to the war to fight. He was a slave and left his owner. His mother died when he was five years old but before she died she gave Charlie to Mrs. Frances Owens (white lady). She came to Des Arc and ran the City Hotel. He never saw his father till he was grown. He worked for Mrs. Owens. He never did run with colored folks then. He nursed her grandchildren, Guy and Ira Brown. When he was grown he bought a farm at Green Grove....

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Growth of the Soil

By: Knut Hamsun

Excerpt: Chapter One. The long, long road over the moors and up into the forest?who trod it into being first of all? Man, a human being, the first that came here. There was no path before he came. Afterward, some beast or other, following the faint tracks over marsh and moorland, wearing them deeper; after these again some Lapp gained scent of the path, and took that way from field to field, looking to his reindeer. Thus was made the road through the great Almenning?the ...

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In the Seven Woods

By: William Butler Yeats

Excerpt: In the Seven Woods. I HAVE heard the pigeons of the Seven Woods Make their faint thunder, and the garden bees Hum in the lime?tree flowers; and put away The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness That empty the heart. I have forgot awhile Tara uprooted, and new commonness Upon the throne and crying about the streets And hanging its paper flowers from post to post, Because it is alone of all things happy. I am contented, for I know that Quiet Wanders laughing...

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The Arabian Nights Entertainments, Complete

Excerpt: This, the ?Aldine Edition? of ?The Arabian Nights Entertainments,? forms the first four volumes of a proposed series of reprints of the Standard works of fiction which have appeared in the English language. It is our intention to publish the series in an artistic way, well illustrating a text typographically as perfect as possible. The texts in all cases will be carefully chosen from approved editions. The series is intended for those who appreciate well printed...

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The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Volume Ii

By: Lord Macaulay

The public voice has assigned to Dryden the first place in the second rank of our poets, no mean station in a table of intellectual precedency so rich in illustrious names. It is allowed that, even of the few who were his superiors in genius, none has exercised a more extensive or permanent influence on the national habits of thought and expression. His life was commensurate with the period during which a great revolution in the public taste was effected; and in that rev...

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Hurrah for New England!

By: Louisa C. Tuthill

Excerpt: LETTER I. THE DOCTOR?S PRESCRIPTION. FROM PIDGIE TO HIS COUSIN BENNIE. Marblehead, July 1st, 1846. Do you remember, my dear cousin, how scornfully we used to look at ?little crooked Massachusetts,? as we called it, on the map, while comparing the other States with good old Virginia? I don?t believe that we ever even noticed such a town in it as Marblehead; and yet here I am, in that very place; and though I love our noble State as well as ever, I am beginning to...

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