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Anna Karenina, Vol. 5

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

PART FIVE: I. Princess Shcherbatskaia considered that it was out of the question for the wedding to take place before Lent, just five weeks off, since not half the trousseau could possibly be ready by that time. But she could not but agree with Levin that to fix it for after Lent would be putting it off too late, as an old aunt of Prince Shcherbatsky's was seriously ill and might die, and then the mourning would delay the wedding still longer. And therefore, deciding to ...

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Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank

By: Thomas Jefferson

The bill for establishing a National Bank undertakes among other things: 1. To form the subscribers into a corporation. -- 2. To enable them in their corporate capacities to receive grants of land; and so far is against the laws of Mortmain. [1] -- 3. To make alien subscribers capable of holding lands, and so far is against the laws of Alienage. -- 4. To transmit these lands, on the death of a proprietor, to a certain line of successors; and so far changes the course of Descents.

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Sawney Bean and His Family

By: John Nicholson

The following account, though as well attested as any historical fact can be, is almost incredible, for the monstrous and unparalleled barbarities that it relates; there being nothing that we ever heard of with the same degree of certainty, that may be compared with it, or that shews how far a brutal temper, untamed by education, and knowledge of the world, may carry a man in such glaring and horrible colours.

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The People of the Abyss

By: Jack London

PREFACE The experiences related in this volume fell to me in the summer of 1902. I went down into the under-world of London with an attitude of mind which I may best liken to that of the explorer. I was open to be convinced by the evidence of my eyes, rather than by the teachings of those who had not seen, or by the words of those who had seen and gone before. Further, I took with me certain simple criteria with which to measure the life of the under-world. That which ma...

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The Clemency of the Court

By: Willa Sibert Cather

Damn you! What do you mean by giving me hooping like that? Serge Povolitchky folded his big workworn hands and was silent. That helpless, doglike silence of his always had a bad effect on the guard's temper, and he turned on him afresh. What do you mean by it, I say? Maybe you think you are some better than the rest of us; maybe you think you are too good to work. We'll see about that....

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Five Thousand Dollars Reward

By: Frank Pinkerton

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE TRAMP. ?Will you give me a glass of water, please?? A ragged, bearded tramp stood before the door of a cottage near the outskirts of a country village, and propounded this question to a pretty girl who stood in the door. ?In a moment.? The girl disappeared, soon returning with a pitcher. She went to the pump near, and soon had the pitcher running over with sparkling water. ?I will bring a cup.? ?Needn't mind.? The tramp lifted the pitcher and quaf...

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Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4

By: Wolfgang Menzel

Excerpt: PART XXI. THE RISE OF PRUSSIA (CONTINUED). CCXLIV. Art and Fashion Although art had, under French influence, become unnatural, bombastical, in fine, exactly contrary to every rule of good taste, the courts, vain of their collections of works of art, still emulated each other in the patronage of the artists of the day, whose creations, tasteless as they were, nevertheless afforded a species of consolation to the people, by diverting their thoughts from the miseries of daily existence.

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She Stoops to Conquer

By: Oliver Goldsmith

Excerpt: Dear Sir, By inscribing this slight performance to you, I do not mean so much to compliment you as myself. It may do me some honour to inform the public, that I have lived many years in intimacy with you. It may serve the interests of mankind also to inform them, that the greatest wit may be found in a character, without impairing the most unaffected piety.

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The Poetical Works of O.W. Holmes, Volume 3

By: Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

Excerpt: A sick man?s chamber, though it often boast The grateful presence of a literal toast, Can hardly claim, amidst its various wealth, The right unchallenged to propose a health; Yet though its tenant is denied the feast, Friendship must launch his sentiment at least, As prisoned damsels, locked from lovers? lips, Toss them a kiss from off their fingers? tips.

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Shaman, Saiva and Sufi

By: R. O. Winstedt

PREFACE: THis book is the outcome of a close study of the language and beliefs of the Malays during a period of residence in the Malay Peninsula that has now reached twenty-two years. Its object is to unravel a complex system of magic in the light of historical and comparative data. By itself this system is a tangle every thread of which scholars working in Europe are led to term Malay, although even the native distinguishes this thread as Indian and that as Muslim. Chap...

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Anne

By: Rebecca Harding Davis

IT was a strange thing, the like of which had never before happened to Anne. In her matter-of-fact, orderly life mysterious impressions were rare. She tried to account for it afterward by remembering that she had fallen asleep out-of-doors. And out-of-doors, where there is the hot sun and the sea and the teeming earth and tireless winds, there are perhaps great forces at work, both good and evil, mighty creatures of God going to and fro, who do not enter into the strong ...

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The Life of Captain James Cook

By: Arthur Kitson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. EARLY YEARS. James Cook, the Circumnavigator, was a native of the district of Cleveland, Yorkshire, but of his ancestry there is now very little satisfactory information to be obtained. Nichols, in his Topographer and Genealogist, suggests that ?James Cooke, the celebrated mariner, was probably of common origin with the Stockton Cookes.? His reason for the suggestion being that a branch of the family possessed a crayon portrait of some relation, which...

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A New View of Society

By: Robert Owen

Excerpt: MY DEAR SIR In contemplating, the public characters of the day, no one among them appears to have more nearly adopted in practice the principles which this Essay develops than yourself. In all the most important questions which have come before the senate since you became a legislator, you have not allowed the mistaken considerations of sect or party to influence your decisions; so far as an unbiased judgement can be formed of them, they appear generally to have...

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Perfect Behavior

By: Donald Ogden Stewart

Excerpt: CHAPTER ONE: The ETIQUETTE OF COURTSHIP A FEW WORDS ABOUT LOVE Courtship is one of the oldest of social customs, even antedating in some countries such long?established usages as marriage, or the wearing of white neckties with full evening dress. The beginnings of the etiquette of courtship were apparently connected in some way with the custom of ?love? between the sexes, and many of the old amatory forms still survive in the modern courtship. It is generally ag...

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Master Olof : A Drama in Five Acts

By: August Strindberg

Introduction: The original prose version of Master Olof, which is here presented for the first time in English form, was written between June 8 and August 8, 1872, while Strindberg, then only twenty?three years old, was living with two friends on one of the numerous little islands that lie between Stockholm and the open sea. Up to that time he had produced half?a?dozen plays, one of which had been performed at the Royal Theatre of Stockholm and had won him the good?will ...

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Romola

By: George Eliot

Proem More than three centuries and a half ago, in the mid spring-time of 1492, we are sure that the angel of the dawn, as he travelled with broad slow wing from the Levant to the Pillars of Hercules, and from the summits of the Caucasus across all the snowy Alpine ridges to the dark nakedness of the Western isles, saw nearly the same outline of firm land and unstable sea—saw the same great mountain shadows on the same valleys as he has seen to-day—saw olive mounts, and ...

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The Love of Ulrich Nebendahl

By: Jerome K. Jerome

Excerpt: Perhaps of all, it troubled most the Herr Pfarrer. Was he not the father of the village? And as such did it not fall to him to see his children marry well and suitably? marry in any case.

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Selected Poems When the Lamp Is Shattered

By: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Excerpt: WHEN THE LAMP IS SHATTERED When the lamp is shattered, The light in the dust lies dead; When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow?s glory is shed; When the lute is broken, Sweet tones are remembered not; When the lips have spoken, Loved accents are soon forgot. As music and splendor Survive not the lamp and the lute, The heart?s echoes render No song when the spirit is mute: No song but sad dirges, Like the wind through a ruined cell, Or the mournful surges That ...

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The Romany Rye

By: George Borrow

Excerpt: Chapter One. The Making of the Linch?pin The Sound Sleeper Breakfast The Postillion?s Departure. I awoke at the first break of day, and, leaving the postillion fast asleep, stepped out of the tent. The dingle was dank and dripping. I lighted a fire of coals, and got my forge in readiness. I then ascended to the field, where the chaise was standing as we had left it on the previous evening. After looking at the cloud?stone near it, now cold, and split into three ...

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Vittoria

By: George Meredith

Excerpt: Chapter 1. UP MONTE MOTTERONE. From Monte Motterone you survey the Lombard plain. It is a towering dome of green among a hundred pinnacles of grey and rust?red crags. At dawn the summit of the mountain has an eagle eye for the far Venetian boundary and the barrier of the Apennines; but with sunrise come the mists. The vast brown level is seen narrowing in; the Ticino and the Sesia waters, nearest, quiver on the air like sleepy lakes; the plain is engulphed up to...

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