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The Little Minister

By: James Matthew Barrie

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE LOVE?LIGHT. Long ago, in the days when our caged blackbirds never saw a king?s soldier without whistling impudently, ?Come ower the water to Charlie,? a minister of Thrums was to be married, but something happened, and he remained a bachelor. Then, when he was old, he passed in our square the lady who was to have been his wife, and her hair was white, but she, too, was still unmarried. The meeting had only one witness, a weaver, and he said solemn...

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The Satyricon of Petronius, Illustrated, V1

By: Petronius Arbiter

Preface: Among the difficulties which beset the path of the conscientious translator, a sense of his own unworthiness must ever take precedence; but another, scarcely less disconcerting, is the likelihood of misunderstanding some allusion which was perfectly familiar to the author and his public, but which, by reason of its purely local significance, is obscure and subject to the misinterpretation and emendation of a later generation.

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Kirsteen

By: Oliphant, Margaret Oliphant Wilson, 1828-1897

The scene was the parlour at Drumcarro, in the wilds of Argyllshire, the speakers the mistress of the house de jure, and she who was at the head of affairs de facto, Marg'ret the housekeeper, cook, lady's maid, and general manager of everything. Mrs. Douglas had brought Marg'ret with her as her maid, when she came to Drumcarro as a bride some thirty years before; but as she went on having child after child for nearly twenty years, without much stamina of either mind or b...

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One Day's Courtship

By: Robert Barr

Excerpt: Chapter 1. John Trenton, artist, put the finishing touches to the letter he was writing, and then read it over to himself. It ran as follows:? ?I sail for England on the 27th. But before I leave I want to have another look at the Shawenegan Falls. Their roar has been in my ears ever since I left there. That tremendous hillside of foam is before my eyes night and day. The sketches I took are not at all satisfactory, so this time I will bring my camera with me, an...

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The Brother of Daphne

By: Dornford Yates

Chapter I Punch and Judy Chapter II Clothes and the man Chapter III When it was dark Chapter IV Adam and New Year’s eve Chapter V The Judgement of Paris Chapter VI Which to adore Chapter VII Every picture tells a story Chapter VIII The Busy Beers Chapter IX A point of honour Chapter X Pride goeth before Chapter XI The love scene Chapter XII The order of the bath Chapter XIII A lucid interval Chapter XIV A private view Chapter XV All found...

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Poor Jack

By: Frederick Marryat

I have every reason to believe that I was born in the year of our Lord 1786, for more than once I put the question to my father, and he invariably made the same reply: Why, Jack, you were launched a few months before the Druids were turned over to the Melpomene. I have since ascertained that this remarkable event occurred in January 1787. But my father always reckoned in this way: if you asked him when such an event took place, he would reply, so many years or months aft...

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The Great Learning

Excerpt: WHAT THE GREAT LEARNING teaches, is to illustrate illustrious virtue; to renovate the people; and to rest in the highest excellence. The point where to rest being known, the object of pursuit is then determined; and, that being determined, a calm unperturbedness may be attained to. To that calmness there will succeed a tranquil repose. In that repose there may be careful deliberation, and that deliberation will be followed by the attainment of the desired end. T...

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Frank Merriwell at Yale

By: Burt L. Standish

Excerpt: Chapter 1. TROUBLE BREWING. ?Here?s to good old Yale?drink it down! Here?s to good old Yale?drink it down! Here?s to good old Yale, She?s so hearty and so hale? Drink it down! Drink it down! down! down!? From the open window of his rooms on York Street Frank Merriwell heard the distant chorus of a rollicking band of students who had been having a merry evening in town. Frank had passed his examinations successfully and had been admitted as a student at Yale. In ...

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A Theologico-Political Treatise Part I

By: Baruch Spinoza

Preface: Men would never be superstitious, if they could govern all their circumstances by set rules, or if they were always favoured by fortune: but being frequently driven into straits where rules are useless, and being often kept fluctuating pitiably between hope and fear by the uncertainty of fortune?s greedily coveted favours, they are consequently, for the most part, very prone to credulity. (2) The human mind is readily swayed this way or that in times of doubt, e...

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Flatland : A Romance of Many Dimensions

By: Edwin A. Abbott

The reason is obvious. Dimension implies direction, implies measurement, implies the more and the less. Now, all our lines are EQUALLY and INFINITESIMALLY thick (or high, whichever you like); consequently, there is nothing in them to lead our minds to the conception of that Dimension. No 'delicate micrometer' -- as has been suggested by one too hasty Spaceland critic -- would in the least avail us; for we should not know WHAT TO MEASURE, NOR IN WHAT DIRECTION. When we se...

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True Spiritual Liberty

By: William Penn

(Condensed from A Brief Examination and State of Liberty Spiritual Both with respect to Persons in their private capacity and in their Church Society and Communion. 1681) Dear Friends and Brethren, True spiritual Liberty is one of the most glorious things in the World, but it is little understood and frequently abused by many. I beseech Almighty God to preserve you, His people, in the right knowledge and use of the liberty, which Jesus Christ is redeeming us into.

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Jacques Damourby Emile Zola and Hennique

By: Frank J. Morlock

Excerpt: A dining room, separated from a butcher shop by a glass of rough squares. In the glass partition: a small ticket window, under the window a drawer. A door not far from the ticket window by the partition to the butcher shop. A door to the right leading to the street, flanked by a window. Door to the left. A buffet, table, mahogany chairs. The action takes place at Batignolles. (Sagnard is seated at the table perusing a newspaper. Pauline and Francoise are ready t...

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The Landloper

By: Holman Day

Excerpt: I. IN THE DUST OF THE LONG HIGHWAY The man who called himself Walker Farr plodded down the dusty stretches of a country road. He moved leisurely. He neither slouched like a vagabond nor did he swing with a stride which indicated that he had aim in life or destination in mind. When he came under arching elms he plucked his worn cap from his head and stuffed it into a coat pocket which already bulged bulkily against his flank. He gazed to right and left upon the g...

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A Treatise of Civil Power in Ecclesiastical Causes

By: John Mllton

Excerpt: THAT IT IS NOT LAWFUL For ANY POWER ON EARTH TO COMPEL IN MATTERS OF RELIGION. TO THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF ENGLAND, WITH THE DOMINIONS THEREOF. I have prepared, Supreme Council! against the much?expected time of your sitting, this treatise; which, though to all Christian magistrates equally belonging, and therefore to have been written in the common language of Christendom, natural duty and affection hath confined and dedicated first to my own natio...

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A Strange Story

By: Ivan Turgenev

Excerpt: FIFTEEN years ago began H. official duties compelled me to spend a few days in the principal town of the province of T . I stopped at a very fair hotel, which had been established six months before my arrival by a Jewish tailor, who had grown rich. I am told that it did not flourish long, which is often the case with us; but I found it still in its full splendour: the new furniture emitted cracks like pistol?shots at night; the bed?linen, table?cloths, and napki...

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The Werwolves

By: Henry Beaugrand

Excerpt: A motley and picturesque?looking crowd had gathered within the walls of Fort Richelieu to attend the annual distribution of powder and lead, to take Part 1n the winter drills and target practice, and to join in the Christmas festivities, that would last until the fast?approaching New Year. Coureurs des bois from the Western country, scouts, hunters, trappers, militiamen, and habitants from the surrounding settlements, Indian warriors from the neighbouring tribe ...

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Sherlock Holmes and the Grand Horizontals

By: Frank J. Morlock

Caroline: Shy! Never shy! I am Caroline Otero. I am Spanish by birth. Two three years ago I am come to France. I am danseuse, Monsieur. (she executes a seductive movement) The best. All Paris, all France, all the whole worl' love me dance. Nobody dance like me. (executing a bump and grind) Many many man fall in love with me. They cannot help. I fall in love with them. I cannot help. They all so nice to me. One man—he's very nice. He give me flowers—jewels—furs—big houz. ...

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Christmas Eve in War Times

By: Edward P. Roe

PREFACE: Months since, with much doubt and diffidence, I began this simple story. I had never before written expressly for young people, and I knew that the honest little critics could not be beguiled with words which did not tell an interesting story. How far I have succeeded, the readers of this volume, and of the St. Nicholas magazine, wherein the tale appeared as a serial, alone can answer. I have portrayed no actual experience, but have sought to present one which m...

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Arsene Lupin

By: Edgar Jepson

Excerpt: Oriental or Renaissance cabinets, mingled with the hues of the pictures, the tapestry, the Persian rugs about the polished floor to fill the hall with a rich glow of colour. But of all the beautiful and precious things which the sun?rays warmed to a clearer beauty, the face of the girl who sat writing at a table in front of the long windows, which opened on to the centuries?old turf of the broad terrace, was the most beautiful and the most precious.

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Criticism

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Excerpt: IT HAS been said that a good critique on a poem may be written by one who is no poet himself. This, according to your idea and mine of poetry, I feel to be falsethe less poetical the critic, the less just the critique, and the converse. On this account, and because the world?s good opinion as proud of your own. Another than yourself might here observe, ?Shakespeare is in possession of the world?s good opinion, and yet Shakespeare is the greatest of poets. It app...

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