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Other People Who Read Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Volume 1 Also Read


 
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Catalogue of Paintings and Drawings, With a Summary of Other Works...

By: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston Museum of Fine Arts
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The Students' Marx : An Introduction to the Study of Karl Marx' Ca...

By: Aveling, Edward Bibbins, 1851-1898; Marx, Karl, 1818-1883
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Revolution and Counter-Revolution : Or, Germany in 1848

By: Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Eleanor Marx Aveling

Originally published in the New York tribune, 1851-52, in a series of articles on which Marx and Engels collaborated.

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Relativity : The Special and General Theory

By: Albert Einstein

Reference Publication

Excerpt: Part I: The Special Theory of Relativity: // 01. Physical Meaning of Geometrical Propositions // 02. The System of Coordinates // 03. Space and Time in Classical Mechanics // 04. The Galilean System of Coordinates // 05. The Principle of Relativity (in the Restricted Sense) // 06. The Theorem of the Addition of Velocities employed in Classical Mechanics // 07. The Apparent Incompatibility of the Law of Propagation of Light with the Principle of Relativity // 08....

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The Divine Comedy

By: Alighieri, Dante, 1265-1321

CANTO I: IN the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct: and e'en to tell It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death. Yet to discourse of what there good befell, All else will I relate discover'd there. How first I enter'd it I scarce can say, Such sleepy dullness in that instant weigh'd My senses down, ...

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Inferno/Hell

By: Dante Aligheri

It is a happiness for me to connect this volume with the memory of my friend and master from youth. I was but a beginner in the study of the Divine Comedy when I first had his incomparable aid in the understanding of it. During the last year of his life he read the proofs of this volume, to what great advantage to my work may readily be conceived.

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The Three Musketeers

By: Pere Alexander Dumas

AUTHOR'S PREFACE: In which it is proved that, notwithstanding their names' ending in OS and IS, the heroes of the story which we are about to have the honor to relate to our readers have nothing mythological about them. A short time ago, while making researches in the Royal Library for my History of Louis XIV, I stumbled by chance upon the Memoirs of M. d'Artagnan, printed—as were most of the works of that period, in which authors could not tell the truth without the ris...

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Crime and Punishment

By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Dostoevsky was the son of a doctor. His parents were very hard- working and deeply religious people, but so poor that they lived with their five children in only two rooms. The father and mother spent their evenings in reading aloud to their children, generally from books of a serious character. Though always sickly and delicate Dostoevsky came out third in the final examination of the Petersburg school of Engineering. There he had already begun his first work, Poor Folk...

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The Origins of Contemporary France : The Ancient Regime

By: Hippolyte A. Taine

INTRODUCTION: Why should we fetch Taine's work up from its dusty box in the basement of the national library? First of all because his realistic views of our human nature, of our civilization and of socialism as well as his dark premonitions of the 20th century were proven correct. Secondly because we may today with more accuracy call his work...

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The French Revolution, Volume 3

By: Hippolyte A. Taine

PREFACE: In Egypt, says Clement of Alexandria, [1] the sanctuaries of the temples are shaded by curtains of golden tissue. But on going further into the interior in quest of the statue, a priest of grave aspect, advancing to meet you and chanting a hymn in the Egyptian tongue, slightly raises a veil to show you the god. And what do you behold? A crocodile, or some indigenous serpent, or other dangerous animal, the Egyptian god being a beast sprawling on a purple carpet....

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Sir Thomas More

By: William Shakespeare

THE PROLOGVE. I Come no more to make you laugh, Things now, That beare a Weighty, and a Serious Brow, Sad, high, and working, full of State and Woe: Such Noble Scoenes, as draw the Eye to flow We now present. Those that can Pitty, heere May (if they thinke it well) let fall a Teare, The Subiect will deserue it. Such as giue Their Money out of hope they may beleeue, May heere finde Truth too. Those that come to see Onely a show or two, and so agree, The Play may passe: If...

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Hamlet, Prince of Denmark : With Introduction and Notes by K. Deig...

By: William Shakespeare

Table of Content -- Act 1, Scene 1: Elsinore. A platform before the castle. -- Act 1, Scene 2: A room of state in the castle. -- Act 1, Scene 3: A room in Polonius’ house. -- Act 1, Scene 4: The platform. -- Act 1, Scene 5: Another part of the platform. -- Act 2, Scene 1: A room in Polonius’ house. -- Act 2, Scene 2: A room in the castle. -- Act 3, Scene 1: A room in the castle. -- Act 3, Scene 2: A hall in the castle. -- Act 3, Scene 3: A room in the castle. -- Act 3, S...

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Sonnets to Sundry Notes of Music

By: William Shakespeare

From off a hill whose concave womb re-worded A plaintful story from a sistering vale, My spirits to attend this double voice accorded, And down I laid to list the sad-tun'd tale; Ere long espied a fickle maid full pale, Tearing of papers, breaking rings a-twain, Storming her world with sorrow's wind and rain. Upon her head a platted hive of straw, Which fortified her visage from the sun, Whereon the thought might think sometime it saw The carcase of a beauty spent and do...

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The Thousand-Headed Man

By: Kenneth Robeson

Gawaine, Gawaine, what look ye for to see, / So far beyond the faint edge of the world? / D'ye look to see the lady Vivian, / Pursued by divers ominous vile demons / That have another king more fierce than ours? / Or think ye that if ye look far enough / And hard enough into the feathery west / Ye'll have a glimmer of the Grail itself? / And if ye look for neither Grail nor lady, / What look ye for to see, Gawaine, Gawaine?...

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Meno

By: Plato

INTRODUCTION: This Dialogue begins abruptly with a question of Meno, who asks, 'whether virtue can be taught.' Socrates replies that he does not as yet know what virtue is, and has never known anyone who did. 'Then he cannot have met Gorgias when he was at Athens.' Yes, Socrates had met him, but he has a bad memory, and has forgotten what Gorgias said. Will Meno tell him his own notion, which is probably not very different from that of Gorgias? 'O yes -- nothing easier: ...

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1984

By: George Orwell

Chapter One : It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him.

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The Koran : Women

By: Prophet Muhammad

004.001 O mankind! Be careful of your duty to your Lord Who created you from a single soul and from it created its mate and from them twain hath spread abroad a multitude of men and women. Be careful of your duty toward Allah in Whom ye claim (your rights) of one another, and toward the wombs (that bare you). Lo! Allah hath been a watcher over you. 004.002 Give unto orphans their wealth. Exchange not the good for the bad (in your management thereof) nor absorb their weal...

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When God Laughs and Other Stories

By: Jack London

CONTENTS WHEN GOD LAUGHS THE APOSTATE A WICKED WOMAN JUST MEAT CREATED HE THEM THE CHINAGO MAKE WESTING SEMPER IDEM A NOSE FOR THE KING THE FRANCIS SPAIGHT A CURIOUS FRAGMENT A PIECE OF STEAK...

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A Thousand Deaths

By: Jack London

I had been in the water about an hour, and cold, exhausted, with a terrible cramp in my right calf, it seemed as though my hour had come. Fruitlessly struggling against the strong ebb tide, I had beheld the maddening procession of the water-front lights slip by, but now a gave up attempting to breast the stream and contended myself with the bitter thoughts of a wasted career, now drawing to a close. It had been my luck to come of good, English stock, but of parents whose...

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The Illustrious Gaudissart

By: Honoré de Balzac

The commercial traveller, a personage unknown to antiquity, is one of the striking figures created by the manners and customs of our present epoch. May he not, in some conceivable order of things, be destined to mark for coming philosophers the great transition which welds a period of material enterprise to the period of intellectual strength? Our century will bind the realm of isolated power, abounding as it does in creative genius, to the realm of universal but levelli...

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