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The Angel and the Author

By: Jerome K. Jerome

Excerpt: ?It is the first Christmas number that starts me off,? I told him; ?those beautiful pictures ? the sweet child looking so pretty in her furs, giving Bovril with her own dear little hands to the shivering street arab; the good old red?faced squire shovelling out plum pudding to the crowd of grateful villagers. It makes me yearn to borrow a collecting box and go round doing good myself.

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State of the Union Addresses

By: John F. Kennedy

It is a pleasure to return from whence I came. You are among my oldest friends in Washington—and this House is my oldest home. It was here, more than 14 years ago, that I first took the oath of Federal office. It was here, for 14 years, that I gained both knowledge and inspiration from members of both parties in both Houses—from your wise and generous leaders—and from the pronouncements which I can vividly recall, sitting where you now sit—including the programs of two g...

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Beowulf

By: Anonymous

PRELUDE OF THE FOUNDER OF THE DANISH HOUSE LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won! Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes, from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore, awing the earls. Since erst he lay friendless, a foundling, fate repaid him: for he waxed under welkin, in wealth he throve, till before him the folk, both far and near, who house by the whale-path, heard his mandate...

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Aya No Tsuzumi

By: Seami

I am Hitomaru. I live in the valley of Kamegaye. My father Kagekiyo the Passionate fought for the House of Hei and for this was hated by the Genji. I am told they have banished him to Miyazaki in the country of Hy ga, and there in changed estate he passes the months and years. I must not be downcast at the toil of the journey; for hardship is the lot of all that travel on unfamiliar roads, and I must bear it for my father's sake.

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The Soul's Testimony

By: Tertullian, Christian Theologian of Carthage

Excerpt: IF, with the object of convicting the rivals and persecutors of Christian truth, from their own authorities, of the crime of at once being untrue to themselves and doing injustice to us, one is bent on gathering testimonies in its favour from the writings of the philosophers, or the poets, or other masters of this world?s learning and wisdom, he has need of a most inquisitive spirit, and a still greater memory to carry out the research. Indeed, some of our peopl...

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The Dynamiter

By: Robert Louis Stevenson and Fanny Van de Grift Stevenson

TO MESSRS. COLE AND COX, POLICE OFFICERS: Gentlemen,—In the volume now in your hands, the authors have touched upon that ugly devil of crime, with which it is your glory to have contended. It were a waste of ink to do so in a serious spirit. Let us dedicate our horror to acts of a more mingled strain, where crime preserves some features of nobility, and where reason and humanity can still relish the temptation. Horror, in this case, is due to Mr. Parnell: he sits before ...

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Smugglers of Death

By: Maxwell Grant

THERE was menace in the quiet along Manhattan's water front. The foggy, brine-laden air seemed stirring with whispers that crept amid the darkness, though the words remained unheard. It would have taken a person long accustomed to that district to sense that trouble was afoot; nevertheless, the subtle signs were present. Furtive shamblers veered from gloomy spots near deserted piers that rose, ominous and formidable, into the haze-thickened darkness. Others, nervous with...

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Sailing

By: E.F. Knight

Introduction: The choice of a boat?Description of the various parts of a cutter. MORE, probably, could be written on boat?sailing than on any other sport; for this pursuit owes much of its extraordinary fascination to the fact that its science is practically infinite; the most experienced sailor has always something new to learn, and is ever acquiring fresh wrinkles. Of all inanimate objects a boat is surely the most beloved of its owner; there is something almost human ...

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On Friendship, Or Laelius

By: Marcus Tullius Cicero ; translated by C.D. Yonge

Excerpt: Part 1. The augur Quintus Mucius Scaevola used to recount a number of stories about his father?in?law, Gaius Laelius, accurately remembered and charmingly told; and whenever he talked about him always gave him the title of ?the wise? without any hesitation. I had been introduced by my father to Scaevola as soon as I had assumed the toga virilis, and I took advantage of the introduction never to quit the venerable man?s side as long as I was able to stay and he w...

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A Primary Reader

By: E. Louise Smythe

Preface: This book originated in a series of little reading lessons prepared for the first grade pupils in the Santa Rosa public schools. The object of the lessons was three?fold: to provide reading matter for the little ones who had only a small vocabulary of sight?words; to acquaint them early with the heroes who have come down to us in song and story; and to create a desire for literature. It has been my endeavor to follow Dr. G. Stanley Hall?s suggestions in his mono...

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The Valley of Silent Men

By: James Oliver Curwood

Excerpt: Before the railroad?s thin lines of steel bit their way up through the wilderness, Athabasca Landing was the picturesque threshold over which one must step who would enter into the mystery and adventure of the great white North. It is still Iskwatam the ?door? which opens to the lower reaches of the Athabasca, the Slave, and the Mackenzie. It is somewhat difficult to find on the map, yet it is there, because its history is written in more than a hundred and fort...

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Lysbeth, A Tale of the Dutch

By: H. Rider Haggard

DEDICATION: In token of the earnest reverence of a man of a later generation for his character, and for that life work whereof we inherit the fruits to-day, this tale of the times he shaped is dedicated to the memory of one of the greatest and most noble-hearted beings that the world has known; the immortal William, called the Silent, of Nassau.

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Our War with Spain for Cuba's Freedom Including a Description and ...

By: Trumbull White

PREFACE: Information concerning the island of Cuba has been of an exceedingly unsatisfactory character until the search-light of American inquiry was thrown upon it from the beginning of the war for Cuban liberty early in 1895. Although our next-door neighbor to the south, with a perfect winter climate and a host of interesting and picturesque attractions for travelers, tourists had been comparatively few, measured by the numbers that might have been expected. All of the...

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The Fortunes of Oliver Horn

By: F. Hopkinson Smith

Kennedy Square, in the late fifties, was a place of birds and trees and flowers; of rude stone benches, sagging arbors smothered in vines, and cool dirt-paths bordered by sweet-smelling box. Giant magnolias filled the air with their fragrance, and climbing roses played hide and seek among the railings of the rotting fence. Along the shaded walks laughing boys and girls romped all day, with hoop and ball, attended by old black mammies in white aprons and gayly colored ban...

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The Mysterious Visitor

By: R. Austin Freeman

Excerpt: So,? said Thorndyke, looking at me reflectively, ?you are a full? blown medical practitioner with a practice of your own. How the years slip by!

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The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and the Regency, Volume 6

By: Duc De Saint?Simon

Excerpt: CHAPTER XXXIX I went this summer to Forges, to try, by means of the waters there, to get rid of a tertian fever that quinquina only suspended. While there I heard of a new enterprise on the part of the Princes of the blood, who, in the discredit in which the King held them, profited without measure by his desire for the grandeur of the illegitimate children, to acquire new advantages which were suffered because the others shared them. This was the case in questi...

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Life of Johnson, Vol. 2

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D. In 1764 and 1765 it should seem that Dr. Johnson was so busily employed with his edition of Shakspeare, as to have had little leisure for any other literary exertion, or, indeed, even for private correspondence[1]. He did not favour me with a single letter for more than two years, for which it will appear that he afterwards apologised. He was, however, at all times ready to give assistance to his friends, and others, in revising...

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The Socialist Economics of Karl Marx and His Followers

By: Thorstein B. Veblen

The system of doctrines worked out by Marx is characterized by a certain boldness of conception and a great logical consistency. Taken in detail, the constituent elements of the system are neither novel nor iconoclastic, nor does Marx at any point claim to have discovered previously hidden facts or to have invented recondite formulations of facts already known; but the system as a whole has an air of originality and initiative such as is rarely met with among the science...

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Witch Ingrain

By: R. Murray Gilchrist

Excerpt: Of late Michal had been much engrossed in the reading of the black?letter books that Philosopher Bale brought from France. As you know I am no Latinist though once she had been earnest in her desire to instruct me; but the open air had ever greater charms for me than the dry precincts of a library. So I grudged the time she spent apart, and throughout the spring I would have been all day at her side, talking such foolery as lovers use. But ever she must steal aw...

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The Bobbsey Twins at School

By: Laura Lee Hope

Excerpt: Chapter 1. A CIRCUS TRAIN ?MAMMA, how much longer have we got to ride?? asked Nan Bobbsey, turning in her seat in the railroad car, to look at her parents, who sat behind her.

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