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Records: 701 - 714 of 714 - Pages: 
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Travels in Syria and the Holy Land

By: John Burckhardt

It is hoped that little apology is necessary for the publication of a volume of Travels in Asia, by a Society, whose sole professed object is the promotion of discoveries in the African continent. The Association having had the good fortune to obtain the services of a person of Mr. Burckhardt?s education and talents, resolved to spare neither time nor expense in enabling him to acquire the language and manners of an Arabian Musulman in such a degree of perfection, as should render the detection of his real character in the interior of Africa extremely difficult....

CONTENTS. 16 Journal of a Tour from Damascus, in the Countries of the Libanus and Anti-Libanus ...................................page 1 Journal of an Excursion into the Haouran, in the Autumn and Winter of 1810,.................................................51 Journal of a Tour from Aleppo to Damascus, through the Valley of the Orontes and Mount Libanus, in February and March, 1812...........................................................121 Journal of a Tour from Damascus into the Haouran, and the Mountains to the E. and S.E. of the Lake of Tiberias, in the Months of April and May, 1812..................................211 Description of a Journey from Damascus through the Mountains of Arabia Petraea and Desert el Ty, to Cairo, in the Summer of 1812........................................................311 Journal of a Tour in the Peninsula of Mount Sinai, in the Spring of 1816........................................................457 APPENDIX. No. I. An Account of the Ryhanlu Turkmans.......................633 No. II. On the Political Division of Syria, and the recent changes in the Government of Aleppo.........................

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The Vicomte de Bragelonne

By: Pere Alexandre Dumas

Introduction: In the months of March?July in 1844, in the magazine Le Siecle, the first portion of a story appeared, penned by the celebrated playwright Alexandre Dumas. It was based, he claimed, on some manuscripts he had found a year earlier in the Bibliotheque Nationale while researching a history he planned to write on Louis XIV. They chronicled the adventures of a young man named D'Artagnan who, upon entering Paris, became almost immediately embroiled in court intrigues, international politics, and ill?fated affairs between royal lovers. Over the next six years, readers would enjoy the adventures of this youth and his three famous friends, Porthos, Athos, and Aramis, as their exploits unraveled behind the scenes of some of the most momentous events in French and even English history....

Table of Contents: The Vicomte de Bragelonne, 1 -- Alexandre Dumas, Pere, 1 -- Introduction:, 3 -- The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, 4 -- Chapter I: The Letter, 4 -- Chapter II: The Messenger, 9 -- Chapter III: The Interview, 15 -- Chapter IV: Father and Son, 21 -- Chapter V: In which Something will be said of Cropoli?of Cropoli and of a Great Unknown -- Painter, 25 -- Chapter VI: The Unknown, 28 -- Chapter VII: Parry, 33 -- Chapter VIII: What his Majesty King Louis XIV. was at the Age of Twenty?Two, 37 -- Chapter IX: In which the Unknown of the Hostelry of Les Medici loses his Incognito, 44 -- Chapter X: The Arithmetic of M. de Mazarin, 52 -- Chapter XI: Mazarin's Policy, 59 -- Chapter XII: The King and the Lieutenant, 64 -- Chapter XIII: Mary de Mancini, 67 -- Chapter XIV: In which the King and the Lieutenant each give Proofs of Memory, 71 -- Chapter XV: The Proscribed, 77 -- Chapter XVI: ?Remember!?, 80 -- Chapter XVII: In which Aramis is sought, and only Bazin is found, 87 -- Chapter XVIII: In which D'Artagnan seeks Porthos, and only finds Mousqueton, 94 -- Chapter XIX: What D'Artagnan went to Paris for, 100 -- Chapt...

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The Cords of Vanity

By: James Branch Cabell

For the purely reclamatory aspect of what he has done, his reward (so far as that can consist in anything save the doing) must come from insignificantly few directions; so few indeed that he, with a wrily humorous exaggeration, affects to believe them singular. The author of this novel has been pleased to describe the author of this introduction as ?the only known purchaser of the book? and, further, as ?the other person to own a CORDS OF VANITY? I could readily enough acquit myself, with good sound legal proofs, of any such singularity as stands charged in this soft impeachment?and that without appeal to The Cleveland Plain Dealer of eleven years ago (?slushy and disgusting?), or to The New York Post (?sterile and malodorous ... worse than immoral?dull?), or to Ainslee?s Magazine (?inconsequent and rambling ... rather nauseating at times?). These devotees of the adjective that hunts in pairs are hardly to be discussed, I suppose, in connection with any rewards except such as accrue to the possessors of a certain obtuseness, who always and infallibly reap at least the reward of not being hurt by what they do not know?or, for that ma...

CONTENTS: THE PROLOGUE I HE SITS OUT A DANCE II HE LOVES EXTENSIVELY III HE EARNS A STICK-PIN 6 IV HE TALKS WITH CHARTERIS V HE REVISITS FAIRHAVEN AND THE PLAY VI HE CHATS OVER A HEDGE VII HE GOES MAD IN A GARDEN VIII HE DUELS WITH A STUPID WOMAN IX HE PUTS HIS TONGUE IN HIS CHEEK X HE SAMPLES NEW EMOTIONS XI HE POSTURES AMONG CHIMNEY-POTS XII HE FACES HIMSELF AND REMEMBERS XIII HE BAITS UPON THE JOURNEY XIV HE PARTICIPATES IN A BRAVE JEST XV HE DECIDES TO AMUSE HIMSELF XVI HE SEEKS FOR COPY XVII HE PROVIDES COPY XVIII HE SPENDS AN AFTERNOON IN ARDEN XIX HE PLAYS THE IMPROVIDENT FOOL XX HE DINES OUT, IMPEDED BY SUPERSTITIONS XXI HE IS URGED TO DESERT HIS GALLEY XXII HE CLEANS THE SLATE XXIII HE REVILES DESTINY AND CLIMBS A WALL XXIV HE RECONCILES SENTIMENT AND REASON XXV HE ADVANCES IN THE ATTACK ON SELWOODE XXVI HE ASSISTS IN THE DIVERSION OF BIRDS XXVII HE CALLS, COUNSELS, AND CONSIDERS XXVIII HE PARTICIPATES IN SUNDRY CONFIDENCES XXIX HE ALLOWS THE MERITS OF IMPERFECTION 7...

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Scientific American, Volume 22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 Journal of Practical Information, Art, Science, Mechanics, Chemistry, And Manufactures

By: Various

?A boat has been completed which is proved by experiment to be faultless in machinery and arrangement. On the 2d of December, Secretary Robeson, Vice-Admiral Porter, and Commodore Case, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance, went to the Navy Yard at Washington, to witness the experiment with this new engine of destruction. After examining the workings of the machinery, and the manner of firing, one of the destructives was put in the frame and the party proceeded to the shore to witness the result. A torpedo of only thirty-six pounds was first run out with rapidity and fired; but the result showed that this small amount of powder, even, would have been sufficient to destroy any ship, by lifting her out of the water and breaking her back, even if her bottom was not knocked out altogether. Mud and water were thrown up together, and the concussion was felt far up in the Navy Yard, the ground being shaken by the shock of the powder against the bed of the river. The concussion felt on board the torpedo-boat was not more than that caused by a wave striking a vessel at sea....

Contents: (Illustrated articles are marked with an asterisk.) *Engines of the Spanish Gunboats The Torpedo Problem Sugar Making in Louisiana Sticking, or Court Plaster *An Improved Hoisting Pulley Wanted *Ferdinand De Lesseps--Chief Promoter of the Suez Canal *An Ingenious Vent Peg *A New English Patent Pulley Block Plants in Sleeping Booms *Improved Treadle Motion *Improved Method of Catching Curculios Remains of a Megatherium in Ohio Artificial Ivory American and English Kailway Practice Contrasted 3...

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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume V, Number 29, March, 1860 a Magazine of Literature, Art, And Politics

By: Various

The American character is now generally acknowledged to be the most cosmopolitan of modern times; and a native of this country, all things being equal, is likely to form a less prescriptive idea of other nations than the inhabitants of countries whose neighborhood and history unite to bequeathe and perpetuate certain fixed notions. Before the frequent intercourse now existing between Europe and the United States, we derived our impressions of the French people, as well as of Italian skies, from English literature. The probability was that our earliest association with the Gallic race partook largely of the ridiculous. All the extravagant anecdotes of morbid self-love, miserly epicurism, strained courtesy, and frivolous absurdity current used to boast a Frenchman as their hero. It was so in novels, plays, and after-dinner stories. Our first personal acquaintance often confirmed this prejudice; for the chance was that the one specimen of the Grand Nation familiar to our childhood proved a poor emigre who gained a precarious livelihood as a dancing-master, cook, teacher, or barber, who was profuse of smiles, shrugs, bows, and complimen...

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Loc Workshop on Electronic Texts Workshop on Electronic Texts Proceedings

By: James Daly

Acknowledgements: I would like to thank Carl Fleischhauer and Prosser Gifford for the opportunity to learn about areas of human activity unknown to me a scant ten months ago, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation for supporting that opportunity. The help given by others is acknowledged on a separate page....

TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements Introduction Proceedings Welcome Prosser Gifford and Carl Fleischhauer Session I. Content in a New Form: Who Will Use It and What Will They Do? James Daly (Moderator) Avra Michelson, Overview Susan H. Veccia, User Evaluation Joanne Freeman, Beyond the Scholar Discussion Session II. Show and Tell Jacqueline Hess (Moderator) Elli Mylonas, Perseus Project Discussion Eric M. Calaluca, Patrologia Latina Database Carl Fleischhauer and Ricky Erway, American Memory Discussion Dorothy Twohig, The Papers of George Washington Discussion Maria L. Lebron, The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials Discussion Lynne K. Personius, Cornell mathematics books Discussion...

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American Prisoners of the Revolution

By: Danske Dandridge

Preface: The writer of this book has been interested for many years in the subject of the sufferings of the American prisoners of the Revolution. Finding the information she sought widely scattered, she has, for her own use, and for that of all students of the subject, gathered all the facts she could obtain within the covers of this volume. There is little that is original in the compilation. The reader will find that extensive use has been made of such narratives as that Captain Dring has left us. The accounts could have been given in the compiler?s own words, but they would only, thereby, have lost in strength. The original narratives are all out of print, very scarce and hard to obtain, and the writer feels justified in reprinting them in this collection, for the sake of the general reader interested in the subject, and not able to search for himself through the mass of original material, some of which she has only discovered after months of research. Her work has mainly consisted in abridging these re...

CHAPTER PREFACE I. INTRODUCTORY II. THE RIFLEMEN OF THE REVOLUTION III. NAMES OF SOME OF THE PRISONERS OF 1776 IV. THE PRISONERS OF NEW YORK--JONATHAN GILLETT V. WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM, THE PROVOST MARSHAL VI. THE CASE OF JABEZ FITCH VII. THE HOSPITAL DOCTOR--A TORY'S ACCOUNT OF NEW YORK IN 1777--ETHAN ALLEN'S ACCOUNT OF THE PRISONERS VIII. THE ACCOUNT OF ALEXANDER GRAYDON IX. A FOUL PAGE OF ENGLISH HISTORY X. A BOY IN PRISON XI. THE NEWSPAPERS OF THE REVOLUTION XII. THE TRUMBULL PAPERS AND OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION XIII. A JOURNAL KEPT IN THE PROVOST XIV. FURTHER TESTIMONY OF CRUELTIES ENDURED BY AMERICAN PRISONERS XV. THE OLD SUGAR HOUSE--TRINITY CHURCHYARD XVI. CASE OF JOHN BLATCHFORD...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Introductory Note: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN was born in Milk Street, Boston, on January 6, 1706. His father, Josiah Franklin, was a tallow chandler who married twice, and of his seventeen children Benjamin was the youngest son. His schooling ended at ten, and at twelve he was bound apprentice to his brother James, a printer, who published the ?New England Courant.? To this journal he became a contributor, and later was for a time its nominal editor. But the brothers quarreled, and Benjamin ran away, going first to New York, and thence to Philadelphia, where he arrived in October, 1723. He soon obtained work as a printer, but after a few months he was induced by Governor Keith to go to London, where, finding Keith?s promises empty, he again worked as a compositor till he was brought back to Philadelphia by a merchant named Denman, who gave him a position in his business. On Denman?s death he returned to his former trade, and shortly set up a printing house of his own from which he published ?The Pennsylvania Gazet...

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The Cords of Vanity

By: James Branch Cabell

Mr. Cabell, in making ready this second or intended edition of THE CORDS OF VANITY, performs an act of reclamation which is at the same time an act of fresh creation. For the purely reclamatory aspect of what he has done, his reward (so far as that can consist in anything save the doing) must come from insignificantly few directions; so few indeed that he, with a wrily humorous exaggeration, affects to believe them singular. The author of this novel has been pleased to describe the author of this introduction as ?the only known purchaser of the book? and, further, as ?the other person to own a CORDS OF VANITY? I could readily enough acquit myself, with good sound legal proofs, of any such singularity as stands charged in this soft impeachment?and that without appeal to The Cleveland Plain Dealer of eleven years ago (?slushy and disgusting?), or to The New York Post (?sterile and malodorous ... worse than immoral?dull?), or to Ainslee?s Magazine (?inconsequent and rambling ... rather nauseating at times?). These devotees of the adjective that hunts in pairs are hardly to be discussed, I suppose, in connection with any rewards except ...

CONTENTS: THE PROLOGUE I HE SITS OUT A DANCE II HE LOVES EXTENSIVELY III HE EARNS A STICK-PIN

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Ten Years Later

By: Pere Alexandre Dumas

Introduction: In the months of March?July in 1844, in the magazine Le Siecle, the first portion of a story appeared, penned by the celebrated playwright Alexandre Dumas. It was based, he claimed, on some manuscripts he had found a year earlier in the Bibliotheque Nationale while researching a history he planned to write on Louis XIV. They chronicled the adventures of a young man named D'Artagnan who, upon entering Paris, became almost immediately embroiled in court intrigues, international politics, and ill?fated affairs between royal lovers. Over the next six years, readers would enjoy the adventures of this youth and his three famous friends, Porthos, Athos, and Aramis, as their exploits unraveled behind the scenes of some of the most momentous events in French and even English history....

Table of Contents: Ten Years Later, 1 -- Alexandre Dumas, Pere, 1 -- Introduction:, 2 -- Chapter I: In which D'Artagnan finishes by at Length placing his Hand upon his Captain's -- Commission, 4 -- Chapter II: A Lover and His Mistress, 9 -- Chapter III: In Which We at Length See the True Heroine of this History Appear, 15 -- Chapter IV: Malicorne and Manicamp, 22 -- Chapter V: Manicamp and Malicorne, 24 -- Chapter VI: The Courtyard of the Hotel Grammont, 32 -- Chapter VII: The Portrait of Madame, 39 -- Chapter VIII: Le Havre, 44 -- Chapter IX: At Sea, 49 -- Chapter X: The Tents, 53 -- Chapter XI: Night, 59 -- Chapter XII: From Le Havre to Paris, 63 -- Chapter XIII: An Account of what the Chevalier de Lorraine Thought of Madame, 69 -- Chapter XIV: A Surprise for Raoul, 76 -- Chapter XV: The Consent of Athos, 82 -- Chapter XVI: Monsieur Becomes Jealous of the Duke of Buckingham, 86 -- Chapter XVII: Forever!, 93 -- Chapter XVIII: King Louis XIV. does not think Mademoiselle de la Valliere either rich enough -- or pretty enough for a Gentleman of the Rank of the Vicomte de Bragelonne, 97 -- Chapter XIX: Sword?Thrusts in the Water, 103 --...

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Pathological Lying, Accusation, And Swindling : A Study in Forensic Psychology

By: William Healy

This volume is one of a series of Monograph Supplements to the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. The publication of the Monographs is authorized by the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology. Such a series has become necessary in America by reason of the rapid development of criminological research in this country since the organization of the Institute. Criminology draws upon many independent branches of science, such as Psychology, Anthropology, Neurology, Medicine, Education, Sociology, and Law. These sciences contribute to our understanding of the nature of the delinquent and to our knowledge of those conditions in home, occupation, school, prison, etc., which are best adapted to elicit the behavior that the race has learned to approve and cherish....

Na

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The Discovery of the Source of the Nile

By: John Hanning Speke

Editor?s Note: John Hanning Speke was a man of thirty-six, when his Nile Journal appeared. He had entered the army in 1844, and completed ten years of service in India, serving through the Punjab Campaign. Already he had conceived the idea of exploring Africa, before his ten years were up, and on their conclusion he was appointed a member of the expedition preparing to start under Sir Richard (then Lieutenant Burton) for the Somali country. He was wounded by the Somalis, and returned to England on sick leave; the Crimean War then breaking out, be served through it, and later, December 1856, joined another expedition under Burton. Then it was that the possibility of the source of the Nile being traced to one of the inland lakes seems to have struck him....

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Editorial Committee

By: Queeneth Mkabela

Excerpt: When I presented Indilinga at one African University, a lady professor passionately questioned the method that would be used in evaluating Indilinga articles as well as methods that would be used for research inclined articles. She argued that because ?Eurocentric? methods tend to dominate indigenous knowledge research practices, euro centrism also might influence the review procedure of articles for publication in the journal. Similar questions tended to surface every time I presented Indilinga, particularly at academic institutions....

Table of Contents: 1. Introduction I-Vii -- 2. Indigenous Land Use Management In Lower Changane Chibuto: 1-9 -- 3. Research Methods In Indigenous Mathematical Knowledge: 11-24 -- 4. A Theoretical and Empirical Model for Soil Conservation 25-35 -- 5. Indigenous Approach to Weather Forecasting In Asa L.G.A, 37-44 -- 6. Indigenous Knowledge Practices and Role of Gender In Rice Production 45-52 -- 7. the Usage of Indigenous Plant Materials Among Small-Scale Farmers 53-60 -- 8. An Ethno-Zoological Survey of Insect and Their Allies Among the Remos 61-68 -- 9. Design of An Indigenous Music Information Storage and Retrieval 69-79 -- 10. Phenomenology, Hermeneutics and the Study of Indigenous 81-88 -- 11. ?Tell Me Your Story?: Using Narratives From Interviews to 89-97 -- 12. A Methodology for the Collection and Evaluation of Farmers? Indigenous 99-113...

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Compressed air; Volume: 26 n. 6

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: Technical eBooks Collection; Research and Reference Collection; Candian History; A review of the capabilities and economies of air and gas.; Applied science & technology index; Abstract bulletin of the Insti...

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Records: 701 - 714 of 714 - Pages: 
 
 





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