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Clanton, Alabama

Clanton, Alabama
City
Clanton City Hall
Clanton City Hall
Motto: "A good place to visit...a better place to live!"
Location in Chilton County and the state of Alabama
Location in Chilton County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Alabama
County Chilton
Founded 1866
Incorporated April 23, 1873
Named for General James H. Clanton[1]
Government
 • Type Council/Mayor
 • Mayor Billie Joe Driver
Area
 • Total 22.1 sq mi (57.2 km2)
 • Land 21.9 sq mi (56.8 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation 600 ft (183 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 8,619
 • Density 393/sq mi (151.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 35045-35046
Area code(s) 205
FIPS code 01-15136
GNIS feature ID 0157918
Website .us.al.clantonwww

Clanton is a city in Chilton County, Alabama, United States. It is part of the Birmingham–Hoover–Cullman Combined Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 8,619.[2] The city is the county seat of Chilton County. Clanton is the site of the geographic center of the U.S state of Alabama.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
  • Government 4
  • Economy 5
  • Education 6
  • Transportation 7
  • Media 8
    • Newspaper 8.1
  • Culture and recreation 9
  • Notable people 10
  • References 11
  • External links 12

History

The town was founded by Alfred Baker in 1868, when Chilton County was formed. Clanton was named in honor of General James H. Clanton, a brigadier in the Confederate States Army, and was incorporated on April 23, 1873. Baker was also elected first mayor of the town.[1] Nearby Lay Lake Dam and Mitchell Dam became Alabama Power's first two dams in the state, bringing economic improvements to the area. Immigrants played a part in starting the county's peach industry more than a century ago. Today, the peach industry is the number one industry in Chilton County, not only bringing fame to the county, but also millions of dollars to the local economy. The city of Clanton constructed a water tower in the form of a peach in 1993, becoming a landmark for travelers along Interstate 65.[3]

Early civil rights activist Ida B. Wells reproduced a photographic postcard depicting an 1891 lynching in Clanton to educate the white public of the atrocities committed against blacks.[4]

During World War II, a small German prisoner of war camp was located in Clanton.[5]

Geography

Clanton is located southeast of the center of Chilton County at 32°50'23.316" North, 86°37'41.477" West (32.839810, -86.628188).[6] Clanton, Alabama, in Chilton county, is 37 miles NW of Montgomery, Alabama (center to center) and 144 miles SW of Atlanta, Georgia.[7]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.1 square miles (57.2 km2), of which 21.9 square miles (56.8 km2) is land and 0.15 square miles (0.4 km2), or 0.62%, is water.[8]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Clanton has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[9]

Climate data for Clanton, Alabama
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 14
(57)
15
(59)
19
(67)
24
(75)
28
(83)
32
(90)
33
(91)
33
(91)
31
(87)
25
(77)
19
(66)
14
(57)
23.9
(75)
Average low °C (°F) 2
(36)
3
(37)
7
(44)
11
(51)
15
(59)
19
(67)
21
(69)
21
(69)
17
(63)
11
(51)
5
(41)
2
(36)
11.2
(51.9)
Average precipitation cm (inches) 13
(5)
14
(5.5)
15.7
(6.2)
13
(5)
10
(4)
10
(4)
13.7
(5.4)
10.9
(4.3)
7.9
(3.1)
6.1
(2.4)
8.6
(3.4)
13
(5)
135.9
(53.3)
Source: Weatherbase[10]

Demographics

As of the census[14] of 2010, there were 7,800 people, 3,168 households, and 2,128 families residing in the city.[15] The population density was 383.8 inhabitants per square mile (148.2/km2). There were 3,510 housing units at an average density of 172.7 per square mile (66.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 46.31% White, 46.01% Black or African American, 1.29% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.29% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. 2.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[15]

There were 3,168 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.3% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.93.[15]

In the city the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 23.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 86.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.6 males.[15]

The median income for a household in the city was $30,394, and the median income for a family was $37,568. Males had a median income of $32,484 versus $20,344 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,299. About 15.1% of families and 19.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.5% of those under age 18 and 14.0% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Government

Clanton is governed via the mayor-council system. The mayor is elected in a citywide vote. The city council consists of five members elected from one of five wards.

Economy

Over 80% of Alabama's peach crop comes from Chilton County.[16]

Clanton has a 60-bed hospital with 24-hour emergency care.[3]

One of the biggest events each year in Chilton County is the annual Peach Festival held in June. The festival, held in Clanton, crowns a new Peach Queen each year and also includes a Peach Parade and the Peach Jam Jubliee, a music concert and street fair.[3]

Education

The Chilton County School System provides public education for Clanton. Students in Clanton may attend any public school in Chilton County.[17]

High schools
Chilton County High School (Grades 9 through 12)
LeCroy Technical Center (Grades 10 through 12)

Middle school
Clanton Middle School (Grades 6 through 8)

Elementary schools
Clanton Intermediate School (Grades 3 through 5)
Clanton Elementary School (Grades K through 2)

College
Jefferson State Community College - Chilton-Clanton Campus

Transportation

Chilton County Airport (FAA LID: 02A), also known as Gragg-Wade Field, is a public use airport in Chilton County, Alabama, United States. The airport is located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Clanton, Alabama. It is owned by the Chilton County Airport Authority.[18]

Media

Newspaper

  • The Clanton Advertiser (daily)

Culture and recreation

Clanton has hosted the annual Chilton County Peach Festival since 1952.[16]

The Clanton Conference and Performing Arts Center (CCPAC) is a multi-purpose facility adjacent to the Jefferson State Community College–Clanton campus. The City of Clanton and Jefferson State Community College have worked closely to develop a state-of-the-art multi-purpose facility for trade shows, special events and conferences.[19]

Clanton Parks & Rec:[20]

  • Clanton City Park & City Pool
  • Corner Park
  • E.M. Henry Skills Center & Pool
  • Goosepond Park
  • Ollie Park
  • Clanton Recreation Center

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b Owen, Thomas McAdory; Marie Bankhead Owen (1921). History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. Harvard University: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 716. 
  2. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/01/0115136.html
  3. ^ a b c http://www.boonenewspapers.com/community/clanton2.shtml
  4. ^ Wood, Amy Louise (2009). Lynching and spectacle: witnessing racial violence in America, 1890-1940.  
  5. ^ Hutchinson, Daniel (October 6, 2009). "World War II POW Camps in Alabama". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 13 January 2010. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  7. ^ http://www.citytowninfo.com/places/alabama/clanton
  8. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Clanton city, Alabama". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved June 4, 2014. 
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Clanton, Alabama
  10. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on November 7, 2013.
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 6, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved June 3, 2014. 
  14. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  15. ^ a b c d e "Fact Sheet-Clanton city, Alabama". American Fact Finder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 13 January 2010. 
  16. ^ a b Hoskins Morton, Patricia (December 10, 2009). "Chilton County". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 13 January 2010. 
  17. ^ "Education Opportunities". City of Clanton. Archived from the original on April 4, 2008. Retrieved 13 January 2010. 
  18. ^ Chilton County Airport
  19. ^ http://www.jeffstateonline.com/locations/clanton/ccpac/
  20. ^ http://www.clanton.al.us/city_parks.php
  21. ^ Staff Reports, Atcheson plays 10th Carnegie Hall concert, November 17, 2010, "The Clanton Advertiser", Retrieved November 18, 2010
  22. ^ a b Reichler, Joseph L., ed. (1979) [1969]. The Baseball Encyclopedia (4th ed.). New York: Macmillan Publishing.  
  23. ^ "Jarrod Patterson". Retrieved 23 May 2011 
  24. ^ Scott Mims, Local stars in Spielberg series, returns to ‘Hannah Montana’, August 20, 2010, "The Clanton Advertiser", October 27, 2010
  25. ^ Carlton, Bob (March 21, 2010). "Clanton's Grayson Russell fits in feature films amid regular kid activities". The Birmingham News (Birmingham, Alabama: Alabama Live LLC.). Retrieved 25 March 2010. 

External links

  • City of Clanton official website
  • Chilton County
  • Chilton County Board of Education
  • Chilton County Chamber of Commerce

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