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Alternative giving

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Title: Alternative giving  
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Subject: Giving, Alternative Gifts International, Benefit concert, Charity shop, Pay it forward
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Alternative giving

Alternative giving is a form of Benjamin Franklin as a "trick [...] for doing a deal of good with a little money", which came to be known as "pay it forward."[1] This form of giving is often used as an alternative to consumerism and to mitigate the impact of gift-giving on the environment.[2]

Charities that promote this type of donating will normally provide a card or certificate describing the donation, often with an example of how the donation will be used (such as one day’s worth of food for a hungry person) or a symbolic denomination, called "ownership" or "adoption" (of an animal or a tree for example). Some charities promote alternative giving at weddings in place of wedding favors, normally providing several cards to be left on tables at the reception letting guests know a donation has been made rather than individual cards for each guest. Kate Middleton and Prince William made the decision to "Pay it Forward" with their wedding gifts, asking that the money to be used for gifts be given to charities and good causes.[3]

Pop culture references

The concept was George Costanza, angry at having received a donation to charity instead of an actual gift, made up his own non-existent charity and handed out fake donations to save money on gifts and cheques.

References

  1. ^ Benjamin Franklin to Benjamin Webb, April 22d, 1784
  2. ^ Simplify the Holidays by the Center for a New American Dream
  3. ^ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/16/royal-wedding-charity-gifts_n_836429.html

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