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Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church (Berlin, New Hampshire)

 

Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church (Berlin, New Hampshire)

Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church
The Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church
Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church (Berlin, New Hampshire) is located in New Hampshire
Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church (Berlin, New Hampshire)
Location 20 Petrograd St., Berlin, New Hampshire
Coordinates
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built 1915
Architectural style Orthodox Church
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 79000196[1]
Added to NRHP May 16, 1979

The Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church (Russian: Свято-Воскресенская Православная Церковь, tr. Svyato-Voskresenskaya Pravoslavnaya Tserkov) is a historic Eastern Orthodox Church building on Petrograd Street in Berlin, New Hampshire. The church is known locally as "The Russian Church" because it was built in 1915 by Russian immigrants who were mostly from the provinces of Grodno, Volyn, and Minsk in modern-day Belarus and Ukraine. The church closed in 1963 but reopened in 1974 for the funeral of a Russian immigrant from modern-day Belarus, named Eugenia (Tarasevich) Tupick. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Contents

  • Architecture 1
  • History 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Architecture

Inside the Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church

The Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church was designed by John Bergesen, an architect from New York City. The church was built with six onion domes, which was common in Russian architecture of that period. The dimensions of the church are 36 by 63 feet (11 by 19 m), which does not include the main entrance, and a height of approximately 100 feet (30 m). The inside of the church is divided into three parts: the vestibule, the nave, and the sanctuary.[2] Its icons were some of the last ones to leave Russia before Czar Nicholas II was overthrown.

History

A group of immigrants at the church, around 1916

In 1915, Reverend Arcady Piotrowsky came to Berlin from Cleveland, Ohio to establish an Orthodox church for the approximately 500 Russians that inhabited Berlin at that time. At first the church services were held in another church, but then moved to an old garage owned by the city. A site at the base of Mt. Forest was chosen for a new church building to be built, and on May 1, 1915, construction of the church began. On October 1st, of that same year, the church was complete.

See also

References

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places.  
  2. ^ "Russian Orthodox Church Berlin, New Hampshire". Retrieved March 17, 2012. 
  • Images of America, Berlin by Renney E. Morneau, page 67
  • Postcard History Series, Berlin, published by Arcadia Publishing in 2008 and written by Jacklyn T. Nadeau, page 87

External links

  • Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church official website
  • Berlin New Hampshire HistoryHoly Resurrection Orthodox Church on
  • Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church's page on the Orthodox Church in America (OCA) website
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