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Interstate 422

Interstate 422
Corridor X-1
;">Route information
Length:
;">Major junctions
South end: I-20 / I-59 / I-459 / US-11 south of Bessemer
  SR-269 at Sylvan Springs
US-78 at Adamsville
I-65 at Morris
US-31 at Morris
SR-79 at Pinson
SR-75 at Pinson
North end: I-59 near Argo
Length:
Length:
Length:
Length:
;">
;">Highway system
  • Alabama State Routes

Corridor X-1 or the Birmingham Northern Beltline is the proposed 50.08-mile (80.60 km) by-pass route around Birmingham, Alabama through northern and western Jefferson County to be completed by 2025. Along with the existing I-459, the Northern Beltline would complete the bypass loop of central Birmingham for all interstate traffic.

Current plans for the route have it connecting at I-459's current southern terminus in Bessemer with I-59 at approximately mile marker 147 to the northeast of Trussville near Argo. Additional studies are underway to determine the economic feasibility to continue the route from its proposed northern terminus to I-20 in the Leeds/Moody area.

The route has been designated as the Appalachian Regional Commission, High Priority Corridor X-1, State Route 959 and Interstate 422.

History

As early as the 1960s, the prospect of a complete beltway encircling Birmingham was envisioned. Although the proposal was initially dropped from the original Interstate Highway System, the completion of Birmingham's outer beltway has been speculated since the completion of I-459 in 1985. By 1989, the first federal and local funds were earmarked for a project to study the feasibility of constructing the route.

In September 1993 the Birmingham Metropolitan Planning Organization made a $500,000 request from the Alabama Department of Transportation for preliminary engineering of the beltline. Through the continued efforts of representative Spencer Bachus, in June 1995, the project was designated by the Federal Highway Administration as part of the National Highway System. As a result of this designation, the beltline would be eligible for federal transportation dollars.

In 2000, the Northern Beltline was added to the area’s Transportation Plan, and in 2001, Senator Richard Shelby and Congressman Spencer Bachus secured $60 million to buy right-of-way and do preliminary engineering for the route. In 2003, Shelby secured an additional $2 million for the continued purchasing of right-of-way. Progress continues with the purchasing of additional right-of way through the county as of 2006. Right of Way for the short segment near Pinson between Alabama 75 and Alabama 79 has been completed but construction has yet to commence.

In May 2009, Bachus announced in the Birmingham News that the Northern Beltline had been designated as Interstate 422.[1]

Proposed routing

According to the Birmingham Metropolitan Planning Organization the Northern Beltline would be divided into five separate segments for construction. ALDOT has been purchasing right of way for the first to be built segment between Alabama 79 and Alabama 75 north of Pinson.

Exit List Exit 1 A- Interstate 20 West, Interstate 59 South/ Tuscaloosa, and Meridian Southbound Only

Exit 1 B- Interstate 20 East, Interstate 59 North/ Birmingham Southbound Only

Exit 4- Jefferson County Road 36/ Johns Road/ Bessemer

Exit 5- 15th Street Road/ Bessemer (to the left of Hueytown High School)

Exit 7- Jefferson County Road 46/ Warrior River Road/ Hueytown, Concord

Exit 9- AL-269/ Birmingport Road/ Ensley

Exit 12- US 78, AL 4, AL 5/ Adamsville Parkway

Exit 13 A- Interstate 22 East/ Birmingham, Huntsville, and Montgomery

Exit 13 B- Interstate 22 West/ Jasper, Tupelo, and Memphis

Exit 14- Jefferson County 112/ Brookside Mount Olive Road

Exit 16- Jefferson County 77/ New Found Road

Exit 17- Jefferson County 112/ Mount Olive Road/ Gardendale

Exit 18 A- Interstate 65 South/ Birmingham, Montgomery

Exit 18 B- Interstate 65 North/ Huntsville, Decatur

Exit 19- US 31/ Decatur Hwy./ Morris, Gardendale

Exit 21- Jefferson County 129/ Glenwood Road

Exit 22- Jefferson County 121/ New Castle Road

Exit 23- Jefferson County 151/ Narrows Road/ Pinson

Exit 25- AL 79/ New Bradford Hwy./ Pinson

Exit 26- AL 75/ Pinson

Exit 28- Jefferson County 30/ Old Springville Road/ Clay

Exit 30 A- Interstate 59 South/ Birmingham

Exit 30 B- Interstate 59 North/ Gadsden

Merge with- US 11, AL 7/ Gadsden Hwy.

References

  • Roberts, Chris (September 15, 1993). "JeffCo, Shelby getting $120 million for roads." Birmingham News
  • Gordon, Tom (June 10, 1995) "Northern Beltline gets federal priority." Birmingham News
  • Nicholson, Gilbert (May 11, 2001). "Northern Beltline: Land rush may ensue when road's route announced this summer." Birmingham Business Journal.
  • Birmingham Business Journal (September 4, 2003). "Sen. Shelby continues to bring home transportation bacon." Birmingham Business Journal.
  • Corridor X-1 at Regional Planning Commission of Greater Birmingham site

External links

  • Northern Beltline psgr pm SL DOT site
  • Corridor X-1 at AARoads.com

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