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Lyman Hall

 

Lyman Hall

Lyman Hall
Governor of Georgia
In office
January 8, 1783 – January 9, 1784
Preceded by John Martin
Succeeded by John Houstoun
Personal details
Born April 12, 1724
Wallingford, Connecticut
Died October 19, 1790(1790-10-19) (aged 66)
Burke County, Georgia
Political party Pro-Administration
Residence America
Profession Governor
Signature

Lyman Hall (April 12, 1724 – October 19, 1790), physician, clergyman, and statesman, was a signer of the Hall County is named after him.

Early life and family

Lyman Hall was the son of John and Mary Hall (née Street) Hall and graduated from Yale College in 1747, a tradition his seven siblings would repeat. In 1749, he was called to the pulpit of Stratfield Parish (now Bridgeport, CT). His pastorate was a stormy one: an outspoken group of parishioners opposed his ordination; in 1751, he was dismissed after charges against his moral character which, according to one biography, "Were supported by proof and also by his own confession." He continued to preach for two more years, filling vacant pulpits, while he studied medicine and taught school.

In 1752, he married Abigail Burr of Liberty County – in Georgia, Hall accompanied them. Hall soon became one of the leading citizens of the newly founded town, Sunbury.

Revolutionary War

On the eve of the First Continental Congress, through Hall's influence, the parish was persuaded to send a delegate – Hall himself – to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to the Second Continental Congress. He was admitted to a seat in Congress in 1775. He was one of the three Georgians to sign the Declaration of Independence.

In January 1779, Sunbury was burned by the British. Hall's family fled to the North, where they remained until the British evacuation in 1782. Hall then returned to Georgia, settling in University of Georgia in 1785. At the expiration of his term as governor, he resumed his medical practice.

Death and legacy

In 1790, Hall moved to a plantation in Hall County, Georgia are also named for him.

Augusta, Georgia, memorializes Hall and the other two Georgians who signed the Declaration of Independence. His remains were re-interred there from his original grave on his plantation in Burke County.

In popular culture

Lyman Hall is portrayed in the 1969 Broadway musical

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