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Madison, Alabama

Madison, Alabama
City
City of Madison
The Madison Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 29, 2006.
The Madison Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 29, 2006.
Motto: Play hard, learn well & live richly
Location in Madison County and the state of Alabama
Location in Madison County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Alabama
Counties Madison, Limestone
Government
 • Mayor Troy Trulock
Area
 • Total 29.7 sq mi (77.0 km2)
 • Land 29.6 sq mi (76.6 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation 705 ft (215 m)
Population (2013)[1]
 • Total 46,450
 • Density 1,452/sq mi (560.5/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 35757-35758
Area code(s) 256
FIPS code 01-45784
GNIS feature ID 0122191
Website .gov.madisonalwww

Madison is a city located primarily in Madison County in the northern part of the State of Alabama. Madison extends west into neighboring Limestone County. The city is included in the Huntsville Metropolitan Area and is also included in the merged Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 42,938.[2] Madison is bordered by Huntsville on most sides.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
  • Economy 4
    • Personal income 4.1
    • Industry 4.2
  • Education 5
  • Media 6
  • Infrastructure 7
    • Roads 7.1
    • Rail and airline 7.2
  • Notable people 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

History

Southern Railroad Depot, Madison, Alabama

Madison's first resident was John Cartwright, who settled in the area in 1818. The city was originally known as Madison Station, and grew up in the 1850s around a stop of the 5th Ohio Cavalry, the 59th Indiana Infantry and the 5th Iowa Infantry were sent in pursuit from Huntsville and skirmished with Patterson's rear guard that evening at Fletcher's Ferry on the Tennessee River south of Madison.

More recently, the city has become a fast-growing suburb of Huntsville. In 1980, the population of Madison was about 4,000. As of the 2010 census the city's population is 42,938.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.7 square miles (77.0 km2), of which 29.6 square miles (76.6 km2) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.3 km2), or 0.45%, is water.[3]

Madison is located at (34.715065, -86.739644),[4] primarily within Madison County.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 42,938 people residing in the city, an increase of 44.6% from the 29,329 residing there in 2000. The population consisted of 16,111 households and 11,770 families. The average household size was 2.65, while the average family size was 3.16. 30.8% of the population was age 19 or younger, 61.0% was 20-64, and 8.2% was 65 or older. The median age was 37.0 years. The population was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

The racial makeup of the city was 74.0% White, 14.6% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 7.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.3% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. 4.6% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

According to the Madison Chamber of Commerce, Madison was the fastest-growing city in Alabama as of 2010.[8]

Economy

Personal income

The median income for a household in the city was $92,136, and the median income for a family was $111,217. The per capita income for the city was $41,490. About 3.9% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.9% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Industry

Madison's largest employer is Intergraph, a computer software company based in Madison. They are currently working on a streetlight maintenance program. Thousands of Madison residents commute to Cummings Research Park and Redstone Arsenal in nearby Huntsville. Within the city limits, most of Madison's businesses are retail, with stores and fast-food restaurants lining US 72 to the north and Madison Boulevard to the south.

Education

The Madison City School System, formed in 1998, serves over 8,400 students from the city of Madison and town of Triana.[9] As of 2012, the school system has seven elementary schools serving grades K-6 (Columbia Elementary School, Heritage Elementary School, Horizon Elementary School, Madison Elementary School, Rainbow Elementary School, West Madison Elementary School, and Mill Creek Elementary), two middle schools serving grades 7-8 (Discovery Middle School, Liberty Middle School), and two high schools serving grades 9-12 (Bob Jones High School, James Clemens High School). Madison also has several private schools, including Madison Academy, Lindsay Lane Christian Academy, St John the Baptist Catholic School, and Westminster Christian Academy. Madison Elementary School is the oldest school in the system (est. 1936)

Media

The Madison Record[10] and the Madison County Record[11] have been newspapers for the city since 1967. The Madison weekly news[12] is also another local newspaper.

Infrastructure

Roads

Madison is served by Interstate 565, US 72 (University Drive), and Madison Boulevard (Alabama State Route 20, and Alt. US 72) as main routes for east-west traffic. Slaughter Road, Hughes Road, Wall Triana Highway, and County Line Road are main north-south roads in the city.

Rail and airline

The Norfolk Southern railway has a main line and a spur running through Madison. The Port of Huntsville, an intermodal center which includes Huntsville International Airport and a rail cargo center, is just south of the city.

Notable people

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ Madison City Schools - About Us. madisoncity.k12.al.us
  10. ^ The Madison Record
  11. ^ Madison County Record
  12. ^ http://www.madisonweeklynews.com
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^ Alabama State Senate: Bill Holtzclaw
  17. ^ District 2: Meet Bill and His Family
  18. ^

External links

  • City of Madison official web site
  • Madison Chamber of Commerce site
  • Recreation Trails in Madison County

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