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Mississippi Baptist Convention

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Title: Mississippi Baptist Convention  
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Mississippi Baptist Convention

The Mississippi Baptist Convention (MBC or MBSC) is an autonomous association of [1]

Early History

This convention is actually the second organization to have this name. The first Mississippi Baptist Convention lasted just five years, from February 1824, when it first met at Bogue Chitto Church in Pike County, to 1829, after meeting so much resistance that it was agreed that it be disbanded in 1828.[2][3]

The second Convention was formed on December 23-4, 1836. Its first president was Ashley Vaughan and its first Correspondending Secretary S. S. Lattimore. Lattimore was still its president in 1852. The Corresponding Secretary that year was W. J. Denson, and the Recording Secretary was J. T. Freman.[4]

In 1857, the Convention established a newspaper, The Mississippi Baptist, with J. T. Freeman as its editor.[5]

In the same year, the Convention expressed its opinion on the abolition of slavery, saying that it was an attempt "to detract from the social, civil, and religious privileges of the slave population".[6] Baptist churches in the state had been practicing segregation for some years. The Convention had reported in 1938 "that some few of our Churches, and some of our Methodist friends, have adopted the plan of holding separate meetings for the blacks; and that such a course is general attended with an increated interest among them".[7]

Women's societies were some of the largest financial supporters of the Convention in the early 19th century. In 1875, the Convention formally recognized women's organizations.[7]

Affiliated Organizations

Retreat Centers

Affiliated Colleges and Universities

References

  1. ^ Chad Brand and David E. Hankins (2006). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Publishing Group. pp. 120–121.  
  2. ^ Walter Brownlow Posey (1957). The Baptist Church in the lower Mississippi Valley, 1776–1845. University of Kentucky Press. pp. 74,126,141. 
  3. ^ Richard Aubrey McLemore (1971). A history of Mississippi Baptists, 1780–1970. Mississippi Baptist Convention Board. p. 78. 
  4. ^ Carey Crane (1853). "North Carolina". In John Lansing Burrows. American Baptist register, for 1852. American Baptist Publication Society. 
  5. ^ Albert Henry Newman (1901). A century of Baptist achievement. American Baptist publication society. p. 273. 
  6. ^ Edward Nelson Akin (1983). "Mississippi". In Samuel S. Hill. Religion in the southern states: a historical study. Mercer University Press. p. 188.  
  7. ^ a b Randy J. Sparks (2001). Religion in Mississippi. Heritage of Mississippi series 2. University Press of Mississippi. pp. 65,93,158.  

External links

  • Mississippi Baptist Convention Board

Further reading


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