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Seal of the District of Columbia

Great Seal of the District of Columbia
Versions
Details
Armiger District of Columbia
Other elements United States Capitol on the right; on the left, a train steams across a viaduct under a rising sun.
Use To represent the District of Columbia and to authenticate certain documents.

The Secretary of the District of Columbia is the official custodian of the Corporate Seal of the District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871 was passed, organizing the District in its present form). The official seal is always presented in black and white.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Use of the Seal 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

Seal of the District of Columbia in 1876.
This collection of United States Seals was registered by the Library of Congress in 1876. When enlarged, the Seal of the District of Columbia has one noticeable difference: the space now occupied by Statue of Freedom.

When it was first adopted in 1871, the original seal featured Statue of Freedom, which currently sits atop the Capitol Building. By 1888, the seal had been modified to feature a statue of George Washington.

Use of the Seal

It is the policy of the District of Columbia government that the use of the Corporate Seal of the District of Columbia is prohibited, except by permission obtained from the Secretary of the District of Columbia. The display or use of the District of Columbia Seal is restricted to an official purpose as approved by the Secretary. All requests for permission to use or reproduce the Seal of the District of Columbia must be submitted in writing to the Secretary prior to its use by an agency head for any purpose. Determinations about the use of the Seal are solely within the discretion of the Secretary of the District of Columbia. For additional information about the restrictions on the use of the Seal, contact the Office of the Secretary of the District of Columbia or review Mayor’s Memorandum 89-47.

See also

References

External links

  • "Official Symbols of the District of Columbia". Government of the District of Columbia. Retrieved February 5, 2006. 


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