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Shipshewana, Indiana

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Title: Shipshewana, Indiana  
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Subject: Indiana State Road 5, LaGrange County, Indiana, U.S. Route 20 in Indiana, Shelli Yoder, Topeka, Indiana
Collection: Amish in Indiana, Towns in Indiana, Towns in Lagrange County, Indiana
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Shipshewana, Indiana

Shipshewana, Indiana
Town
Motto: "A Town Of Character"[1]
Location of Shipshewana in the state of Indiana
Location of Shipshewana in the state of Indiana
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Indiana
County LaGrange
Township Newbury
Area[2]
 • Total 1.18 sq mi (3.06 km2)
 • Land 1.18 sq mi (3.06 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 892 ft (272 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 658
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 666
 • Density 557.6/sq mi (215.3/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 46565
Area code(s) 260
FIPS code 18-69480[5]
GNIS feature ID 0443413[6]
Website http://www.shipshewana.org/

Shipshewana is a town in Newbury Township, LaGrange County, Indiana, United States. The population was 658 at the 2010 census. It is the location of the Menno-Hof Amish & Mennonite Museum, which showcases the history of the Amish and Mennonite peoples.[7]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Economy 4
  • Arts and culture 5
    • Annual cultural events 5.1
    • Museums and other points of interest 5.2
  • Parks and recreation 6
  • Education 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

Shipshewana was named after a local Potawatomi Indian.[8] The Shipshewana post office was established in 1889.[9]

Geography

According to the 2010 census, Shipshewana has a total area of 1.18 square miles (3.06 km2), all land.[2]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 658 people, 297 households, and 177 families residing in the town. The population density was 557.6 inhabitants per square mile (215.3/km2). There were 339 housing units at an average density of 287.3 per square mile (110.9/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.3% White, 0.2% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population.

There were 297 households of which 26.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.1% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.4% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.86.

The median age in the town was 37.7 years. 24.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.6% were from 25 to 44; 21.5% were from 45 to 64; and 22% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 44.7% male and 55.3% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 536 people, 235 households, and 149 families residing in the town. The population density was 582.7 people per square mile (224.9/km²). There were 251 housing units at an average density of 272.9 per square mile (105.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.57% White, 0.37% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.19% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.12% of the population.

There were 235 households out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 33.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 12.7% from 18 to 24, 21.3% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 79.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $30,156, and the median income for a family was $53,214. Males had a median income of $36,875 versus $22,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,270. About 6.0% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 20.8% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Weaver Furniture Sales.

Shipshewana is a large producer of handcrafted Amish furniture. Amish furniture is noted for its durability, solid wood construction and simple elegance.

Arts and culture

Annual cultural events

  • Pajama Sale (First Saturday each February)
  • Mayfest (First Friday and Saturday each May)
  • Pumpkinvine Bike Ride (Third Saturday in June)
  • Shipshewana Antique Festival (First Saturday each August)
  • Fall Crafters Fair (Second Friday and Saturday each October)
  • Camp Shipshewana Summer camp (June through August)
  • Shipshewana Quilt Festival (Fourth week each June)

Museums and other points of interest

Shipshewana is perhaps most famous for its Miscellaneous and Antique Auction, held every Wednesday throughout the year. It also features flea markets (Tuesday and Wednesday in season) as well as the Friday horse auction.

Yoder's Dutch Country Store.

Although a very small town, Shipshewana is home to numerous antique and country-style decor shops and restaurants, especially with a strong Amish flavor. Attractions in Shipshewana include the Shipshewana Flea Market, Menno-Hof Amish History Museum, Blue Gate Restaurant and Theater, The Davis Mercantile, Yoder's Department Store, Over 105 Specialty Stores in the Downtown Area, Hostetler's Hudson Museum and many events and festivals. These attractions, the Amish culture and the natural beauty of the area draw approximately 1.2 million visitors each year. Shipshewana is the only Indiana site listed in 1,000 Places to See Before You Die.

Parks and recreation

The town maintains a park system, including a soccer field complex, softball/baseball diamonds, and a general park/playground adjacent to the Wolfe Building on Morton Street.

Education

The town is served by the Westview School Corporation, in nearby Topeka, home of the Westview Warriors.[12]

References

  1. ^ "Town of Shipshewana Indiana". Town of Shipshewana Indiana. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "G001 - Geographic Identifiers - 2010 Census Summary File 1".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  7. ^ "Menno-Hof - Amish/Mennonite Information Center". Menno-Hof - Amish/Mennonite Information Center. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Profile for Shipshewana, Indiana, IN". ePodunk. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  9. ^ "LaGrange County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 9 December 2014. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Westview School Corporation". Westview School Corporation. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 

External links

  • Town of Shipshewana, Indiana website
  • Shipshewana.com - Links to All Things Shipshewana!
  • Pumpkinvine Nature Trail
  • Westview School Corporation
  • City-Data.com


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