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Theodore J. Lowi

Professor Lowi at the Cornell Club of Boston, May 2009

Theodore J. Lowi (born July 9, 1931) is the John L. Senior Professor of American Institutions teaching in the Government Department at Cornell University. His area of research is the American government and public policy. He is a member of the core faculty of the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Published work 2
  • Honors 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Biography

Theodore J. Lowi was born on July 9, 1931 in Gadsden, Alabama. He and his wife, Angele, reared two children, Anna and Jason. He currently makes his home in Ithaca, New York. Lowi obtained a Bachelor of Arts from Michigan State University in 1954, and an Master of Arts and Ph.D. from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1955 and 1961, respectively. He is a past president of the American Political Science Association and the International Political Science Association. He was voted one of the most influential political scholars of the modern era [2]. Lowi has been a frequent guest on NPR, PBS, and cable television news-issues talk shows.

Published work

  • At the Pleasure of the Mayor: Patronage and Power in New York City, 1898-1958(New York, 1964);
  • Legislative Politics, U.S.A.(ed.)(Boston; 1962, 1965, 1974);
  • The Politics of Disorder(New York, 1971, 1974);
  • Poliscide: Scientists, the Giant Accelerator and the Metropolis (et alia) (New York, 1975, 1990);
  • American Government: Incomplete Conquest (New York, 1976, 1977, 1981);
  • Nationalizing Government: Public Policies in America (et alia)(Beverly Hills, 1978);
  • The Personal President: Power Invested, Promise Unfulfilled (Ithaca, 1985);
  • American Government: Freedom & Power (with Benjamin Ginsburg)(New York, 1990, 1994);
  • Democrats Return to Power: Politics and Policy in the Clinton Era(with Benjamim Ginsburg)(New York, 1994);
  • The End of the Republican Era (1995)
  • "American Business, Public Policy, Case-Studies, and Political Theory" (1964), World Politics 16(4):677-715. (In this journal article, which reviews a book by Raymond A. Bauer, Ithiel de Sola Pool, and Lewis A. Dexter, Lowi lays out his classic typology of public policy in the U.S.: distribution, regulation, and redistribution. This typology was meant to help political scientists and policy scholars build theories of policy making that could be generalized beyond particular issue areas. Distributive policies, aka "pork barrel" programs, distribute resources from the government to particular recipients; the winners are concentrated but the losers (those who ultimately pay for the distribution) are diffuse. Regulatory policies are aimed at groups or classes of targets, rather than individuals, and they typically raise costs for the targets (in which case the costs are concentrated). Redistributive policies transfer resources from one class or group to another. A fourth category of policy named by Lowi is the constituent.)

Honors

See also

References

  1. ^ "TODAY: Yale Graduate School to honor four accomplished alumni". YaleNews. Yale University. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 

External links

  • Cornell website
  • Past Presidents of the APSA
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