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Virtus Bologna

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Virtus Bologna

Virtus Pallacanestro Bologna is an Italian League professional basketball club, based in Bologna. Virtus is one of the most important and titled basketball teams in Europe.

History

Virtus was founded in 1871 as a gymnastics club, and fielded its first professional basketball team in the 1920s. The club has won 15 national league titles in Italy's top division and 8 Italian Cups. It has also been a frequent participant in the Euroleague, the basketball equivalent to football's Champions League. Virtus' best season, as measured by trophies won, was 2000-01, when it won the Italian League, Italian Cup, and Euroleague titles all in the same season, giving the club the coveted Triple Crown championship for the year (though the latter came against the field that did not include all of Europe's national champions as some of them competed in FIBA Suproleague that year). They also won the Euroleague in 1998, led by club hero and icon Predrag Danilović.

Several key members of Virtus' treble-winners left immediately after that accomplishment. After the 2001-02 season, Manu Ginóbili, the Final Four MVP of Euroleague 2000-01, left for the NBA, as did Marko Jarić. At the end of the 2002-03 season, Virtus suffered relegation from Italy's top division as a result of financial problems.

The local derby between Virtus and Fortitudo is one of the most intense in the entire world of sports. Sports Illustrated writer Alexander Wolff devoted a chapter of his 2002 basketball book, Big Game, Small World (ISBN 0-446-52601-0), to this rivalry.

Virtus' home stadium is Unipol Arena (previously known as Palamalaguti).

In 2009, Virtus Bologna returned to European and club success by winning the EuroChallenge, defeating Cholet Basket in the final. MVP of the final-four was Keith Langford.

Sponsorship names

Through the years, due to sponsorship deals, it has been also known as:[1]

  • No name sponsorship (1945–53)
  • Minganti (1953–58)
  • Oransoda (1958–60)
  • Idrolitina (1960–61)
  • No name sponsorship (1961–62)
  • Knorr (1962–65)
  • Candy (1965–69)
  • No name sponsorship (1969–70)
  • Norda (1970–74)
  • Sinudyne (1974–80)
  • Granarolo (1983–86)
  • Dietor (1986–88)
  • Knorr (1988–93)
  • Buckler (1993–96)
  • Kinder (1996-02)
  • No name sponsorship (2002–03)
  • Carisbo Virtus (2003–04)
  • Caffè Maxim (2004–05)
  • VidiVici (2005–07)
  • La Fortezza (Serie A), VidiVici (EuroLeague) (2007–08)
  • La Fortezza (Serie A), Virtus BolognaFiere (EuroChallenge) (2008–09)
  • Canadian Solar (2009–12)
  • SAIE3 (2012-2013)[2]
  • Oknoplast (2013)[3]
  • Granarolo (2013-)

Titles

Total titles: 28

Domestic competitions

  • Italian Championship
    • Winners (15): 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1955, 1956, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1984, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 2001
  • Italian Cup
    • Winners (8): 1974, 1984, 1989, 1990, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002
  • Italian Supercup
    • Winners (1): 1995-96

European competitions

  • Euroleague
    • Winners (2): 1998, 2001
    • Runners-up (3): 1981, 1999, 2002
  • Saporta Cup
    • Winners (1): 1990
    • Runners-up (2): 1978, 2000
  • EuroChallenge
    • Winners (1): 2009
  • Triple Crown (unofficial)
    • Winners (1): 2001

Worldwide competitions

Roster

|- | style="text-align:center;" | SF | style="text-align:center;" | 6 | style="text-align:center;" | Sweden | style="text-align:left;" | Gaddefors, Viktor | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 92 kg (203 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 21 – (1992-08-28)August 28, 1992 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | PG | style="text-align:center;" | 7 | style="text-align:center;" | United States | style="text-align:left;" | Hardy, Dwight | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 89 kg (196 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 26 – (1987-12-02)December 2, 1987 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | F | style="text-align:center;" | 11 | style="text-align:center;" | Australia | style="text-align:left;" | Motum, Brock | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 111 kg (245 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 23 – (1990-10-16)October 16, 1990 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | PG | style="text-align:center;" | 12 | style="text-align:center;" | Italy | style="text-align:left;" | Imbrò, Matteo | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 94 kg (207 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 20 – (1994-02-12)February 12, 1994 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | SF | style="text-align:center;" | 13 | style="text-align:center;" | Italy | style="text-align:left;" | Fontecchio, Simone | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 91 kg (201 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 18 – (1995-12-09)December 9, 1995 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | G | style="text-align:center;" | 14 | style="text-align:center;" | Italy | style="text-align:left;" | Guazzaloca, Federico | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 72 kg (159 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 20 – (1994-02-28)February 28, 1994 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | PF | style="text-align:center;" | 15 | style="text-align:center;" | Italy | style="text-align:left;" | Landi, Aristide | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 87 kg (192 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 20 – (1994-06-04)June 4, 1994 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | PG | style="text-align:center;" | 22 | style="text-align:center;" | United States | style="text-align:left;" | Ware, Casper | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 79 kg (174 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 23 – (1990-11-17)November 17, 1990 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | C | style="text-align:center;" | 23 | style="text-align:center;" | Jamaica | style="text-align:left;" | Jordan, Jerome | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.13 m (7 ft 0 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 115 kg (254 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 27 – (1986-09-29)September 29, 1986 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | C | style="text-align:center;" | 33 | style="text-align:center;" | Saint Vincent and the Grenadines | style="text-align:left;" | King, Shawn | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 100 kg (220 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 32 – (1982-06-07)June 7, 1982 |- |- | style="text-align:center;" | G/F | style="text-align:center;" | 44 | style="text-align:center;" | United States | style="text-align:left;" | Walsh, Matt | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 1.99 m (6 ft 6 in) | style="text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; font-size: 80%" | 93 kg (205 lb) | style="text-align:left;" | 31 – (1982-12-02)December 2, 1982 |-

Notable players

Coaches

  • Italy Renzo Poluzzi - 1948-50
  • Italy Dino Fontana - 1950-51
  • Italy Venzo Vannini - 1951-52
  • Italy Larry Strong - 1952-53
  • Italy Giancarlo Marinelli - 1953-54
  • Italy Larry Strong - 1954-55
  • Italy Vittorio Tracuzzi - 1955-60
  • Spain Eduard Kucharski - 1960-63
  • Italy Mario Alesini - 1963-66
  • Czechoslovakia Jaroslav Sip - 1966-68
    (incl. 4 games from the '68-'69 season)
  • Italy Renzo Ranuzzi - 1968-69
    (18 games)
  • Italy Nello Paratore - 1969-70
  • Italy Vittorio Tracuzzi - 1970-71
    (incl. 4 games from the '71-'72 season)
  • Italy Nico Messina - 1971-73
    (incl. 18 games from the '71-'72 season)
  • United States Dan Peterson - 1973-78
  • United States Terry Driscoll - 1978-80
  • Italy Ettore Zuccheri - 1980-81
    (23 games)
  • Italy Renzo Ranuzzi - 1981
    (18 games from the '80-'81 season)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Aleksandar Nikolić - 1981-82
  • United States George Bisacca - 1982
    (11 games from the '82-'83 season)
  • Italy Mauro Di Vincenzo - 1982-83
    (24 games)
  • Italy Alberto Bucci - 1983-85
  • Italy Alessandro Gamba - 1985-87
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Krešimir Ćosić - 1987-88
  • United States Bob Hill - 1988-89
  • Italy Ettore Messina - 1989-93
  • Italy Alberto Bucci - 1993-97
    (incl. 23 games from the '96-'97 season)
  • Italy Lino Frattin - 1997
    (11 games from the '96-'97 season)
  • Italy Ettore Messina - 1997-02
    (replaced for two games in '01-'02
    by Italy Giordano Consolini)
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina Bogdan Tanjević - 2002
    (14 games from the '02-'03 season)
  • Italy Valerio Bianchini - 2002-03
    (20 games)
  • Italy Giampiero Ticchi - 2003
  • Italy Alberto Bucci - 2003-04
  • Italy Giordano Consolini - 2004-05
  • Republic of Macedonia Zare Markovski - 2005-07
  • Italy Stefano Pillastrini - 2007
  • Italy Renato Pasquali - 2008
  • Italy Matteo Boniciolli - 2008-09
  • Italy Lino Lardo - 2009–11
  • Italy Alessandro Finelli - 2011-2013
  • Italy Luca Bechi - 2013–present

References

External links

  • Official Site (Italian)
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